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Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board Member: Buchner, Johannes / Ludwig, Stephan / Sies, Helmut / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred

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IMPACT FACTOR increased in 2014: 3.268
Rank 106 out of 289 in category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology in the 2014 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Science Edition

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RNA interference by small hairpin RNAs synthesised under control of the human 7S K RNA promoter

Dorota Koper-Emde1 / Lutz Herrmann2 / Björn Sandrock3 / Bernd-Joachim Benecke4

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Citation Information: Biological Chemistry. Volume 385, Issue 9, Pages 791–794, ISSN (Print) 1431-6730, DOI: 10.1515/BC.2004.103, June 2005

Publication History

Received:
May 26, 2004
Accepted:
July 16, 2004
Published Online:
2005-06-01

Abstract

Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) represent RNA duplexes of 21 nucleotides in length that inhibit gene expression. We have used the human gene-external 7S K RNA promoter for synthesis of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) which efficiently target human lamin mRNA via RNA interference (RNAi). Here we demonstrate that orientation of the target sequence within the shRNA construct is important for interference. Furthermore, effective interference also depends on the length and/or structure of the shRNA. Evidence is presented that the human 7S K promoter is more active in vivo than other gene-external promoters, such as the human U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) gene promoter.

Keywords: gene silencing; lamin A/C; pol III transcription; siRNA

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