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Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board Member: Buchner, Johannes / Ludwig, Stephan / Sies, Helmut / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred

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Molecular machinery of mitochondrial dynamics in yeast

Sandra Merz1 / Miriam Hammermeister2 / Katrin Altmann3 / Mark Dürr4 / Benedikt Westermann5

1Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany

2Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany

3Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany

4Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany

5Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany and Bayreuther Zentrum für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth, Germany

Corresponding author

Citation Information: Biological Chemistry. Volume 388, Issue 9, Pages 917–926, ISSN (Online) 14374315, ISSN (Print) 14316730, DOI: 10.1515/BC.2007.110, August 2007

Publication History

Published Online:
2007-08-14

Abstract

Mitochondria are amazingly dynamic organelles. They continuously move along cytoskeletal tracks and frequently fuse and divide. These processes are important for maintenance of mitochondrial functions, for inheritance of the organelles upon cell division, for cellular differentiation and for apoptosis. As the machinery of mitochondrial behavior has been highly conserved during evolution, it can be studied in simple model organisms, such as yeast. During the past decade, several key components of mitochondrial dynamics have been identified and functionally characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These include the mitochondrial fusion and fission machineries and proteins required for maintenance of tubular shape and mitochondrial motility. Taken together, these findings reveal a comprehensive picture that shows the cellular processes and molecular components required for mitochondrial inheritance and morphogenesis in a simple eukaryotic cell.

Keywords: actin cytoskeleton; membrane division; membrane fusion; mitochondria; organelle biogenesis; Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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