Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy

Editor-in-Chief: Jürges, Hendrik / Ludwig, Sandra

Ed. by Auriol , Emmanuelle / Brunner, Johann / Fleck, Robert / Friebel, Guido / Mendola, Mariapia / Requate, Till / Tsui, Kevin / Wichardt, Philipp / Zulehner, Christine

4 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2013: 0.432
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 0.710

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 0.956
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 0.734

VolumeIssuePage

Intergenerational Mobility in Australia

Andrew Leigh1

1Australian National University,

Citation Information: The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy. Volume 7, Issue 2, ISSN (Online) 1935-1682, DOI: 10.2202/1935-1682.1781, December 2007

Publication History

Published Online:
2007-12-26

This article offers supplementary material which is provided at the end of the article.

Abstract

Combining four surveys conducted over a forty year period, I calculate intergenerational earnings elasticities for Australia, using predicted earnings in parents' occupations as a proxy for actual parental earnings. In the most recent survey, the elasticity of sons' wages with respect to fathers' wages is around 0.2. Comparing this estimate with earlier surveys, I find little evidence that intergenerational mobility in Australia has significantly risen or fallen over time. Applying the same methodology to United States data, I find that Australian society exhibits more intergenerational mobility than the United States. My method appears to slightly overstate the degree of intergenerational mobility; if the true intergenerational earnings elasticity in the United States is 0.4–0.6 (as recent studies have suggested), then the intergenerational earnings elasticity in Australia is probably around 0.2–0.3.

Keywords: social mobility; imputed earnings; Australia; United States

Supplementary Article Materials

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.