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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Editorial Board Member: Gillery, Philippe / Kazmierczak, Steven / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Schlattmann, Peter / Whitfield, John B.

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2013: 2.955
Rank 5 out of 29 in category Medical Laboratory Technology in the 2013 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Science Edition

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The Proteome: Anno Domini 2002

Pier Giorgio Righetti / Annalisa Castagna / Francesca Antonucci / Chiara Piubelli / Daniela Cecconi / Natascia Campostrini / Gianluigi Zanusso / Salvatore Monaco

Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. Volume 41, Issue 4, Pages 425–438, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2003.065, June 2005

Publication History

Published Online:
2005-06-01

Abstract

We present some current definitions related to functional and structural proteomics and the human proteome, and we review the following aspects of proteome analysis: Classical 2-D map analysis (isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by SDS-PAGE); Quantitative proteomics (isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT), fluorescent stains) and their use in e.g., tumor analysis and identification of new target proteins for drug development; Electrophoretic pre-fractionation (how to see the hidden proteome!); Multidimensional separations, such as: (a) coupled size-exclusion and reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC; (b) coupled ion-exchange and RP-HPLC; (c) coupled RPHPLC and RP-HPLC at 25/60 °C; (d) coupled RP-HPLC and capillary electrophoresis (CE); (e) metal affinity chromatography coupled with CE; Protein chips.

Some general conclusions are drawn on proteome analysis and we end this review by trying to decode the glass ball of the aruspex and answer the question: “Quo vadis, proteome”?

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