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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Editorial Board Member: Gillery, Philippe / Kazmierczak, Steven / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Schlattmann, Peter / Whitfield, John B.

13 Issues per year

IMPACT FACTOR 2013: 2.955
Rank 5 out of 29 in category Medical Laboratory Technology in the 2013 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Science Edition

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Research translation: a new frontier for clinical laboratories

Mario Plebani1 / Francesco M. Marincola2

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Corresponding author: Mario Plebani, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Via Giustiniani, 2, 35128 Padova, Italy Phone: +39-049-8212780/92, Fax: +39-049-663240,

Citation Information: Clinical Chemical Laboratory Medicine. Volume 44, Issue 11, Pages 1303–1312, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2006.238, November 2006

Publication History

Received:
June 10, 2006
Accepted:
July 12, 2006
Published Online:
2006-11-07

Abstract

Translational research and translational medicine (referred to hereafter as translational research) are interchangeable terms that underline the pressing need to translate into practical benefits for those affected by disease the extensive investments divested by the private and public sectors in biomedical research. For people more directly involved in clinical practice (physicians, clinical laboratory professionals and patients), translational research responds to the need to accelerate the capture of benefits of research, closing the gap between what we know and what we practice. This basically means the transfer of diagnostic and therapeutic advances proven effective in large, well-conducted trials (and, therefore, evidence-based) to daily medical practice. Translational research should be regarded as a two-way road: bench to bedside, and bedside to bench. In particular, to make possible a more effective translation process, a new road map should be implemented through interaction and cooperation between basic researchers, clinicians, laboratory professionals and manufacturers. Some examples of recent developments in clinical laboratory testing, including markers of cardiovascular diseases, clinical proteomics and recombinant allergens, may explain the importance of careful evaluation of all variables that allow the introduction of such new insights into clinical practice to assure better clinical outcomes. The vital role of laboratory medicine in the delivery of safer and more effective healthcare requires more careful evaluation not only of the analytical characteristics, but also of any other variable that may affect the clinical usefulness and diagnostic performances of laboratory tests, thus allowing more accurate interpretation and utilization of laboratory information.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2006;44:1303–12.

Keywords: biomarkers; clinical practice; genomics; laboratory information; proteomics; scientific knowledge; translational research

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