What is a domain? Dimensional structures versus meronomic relations : Cognitive Linguistics

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Cognitive Linguistics

Editor-in-Chief: Newman, John


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What is a domain? Dimensional structures versus meronomic relations

1Cognitive Science, Department of Philosophy, Lund University

2Linguistics and Phonology, Center for Languages and Literature, Lund University

Citation Information: Cognitive Linguistics. Volume 24, Issue 3, Pages 437–456, ISSN (Online) 1613-3641, ISSN (Print) 0936-5907, DOI: 10.1515/cog-2013-0017, July 2013

Publication History

Published Online:
2013-07-27

Abstract

Within cognitive linguistics, the notion of domain is central. In the literature, the notion of domain has been interpreted in an all-encompassing way, which has led to conceptual confusion. The article proposes to distinguish between a more psychologically oriented description of domains based on dimensional structures, on the one hand; and meronomic relations, on the other. It is shown how Langacker's notion of a configurational domain can be analyzed as higher-level dimensional structures. An added benefit of the distinction between dimensional domains and meronomic relations is that it generates a natural account of the difference between metaphors and metonymies.

Keywords: domain; dimension; meronomy; locational domain; configurational domain; feature analysis; integral dimensions; separable dimensions; metaphor; metonymy

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