Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

Forum for Health Economics & Policy

Editor-in-Chief: Goldman, Dana

2 Issues per year

VolumeIssuePage

The Option Value of Innovation

Julia Thornton Snider1 / John A. Romley2 / William B. Vogt3 / Tomas J. Philipson4

1Precision Health Economics,

2University of Southern California,

3University of Georgia,

4University of Chicago,

Citation Information: Forum for Health Economics & Policy. Volume 15, Issue 2, ISSN (Online) 1558-9544, DOI: 10.1515/1558-9544.1306, April 2012

Publication History:
Published Online:
2012-04-18

Standard techniques of cost effectiveness analysis measure a technology’s benefits in terms of expected life years (or quality-adjusted life years) gained at today’s life expectancies. However, this approach ignores the gains which derive from the possibility that a health technology allows an individual to survive long enough to benefit from other technological innovations which raise life expectancy (and quality of life) in the future. Borrowing a term from the finance literature, we refer to this source of value as the “option value” of innovation. We explain where this value comes from and how to calculate it in a variety of standard cost effectiveness analysis contexts. We provide a proof-of-concept using the example of the drug tamoxifen, which delayed the onset of breast cancer for some patients until more effective adjuvant treatment was available. We find that incorporating option value can increase the conventionally estimated value of tamoxifen with better adjuvant treatment by nearly a quarter (from $200,000 to $248,000 for those who initiated tamoxifen in 1999). We expect similar results for other drugs in therapeutic areas of rapid technological advancement.

Keywords: innovation; pharmaceutical; medicine; option value; cancer

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.