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International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship

Ed. by Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne / Cragg, Catherine Elizabeth / Goldenberg, Dolly / Iwasiw, Carroll Louise / Maltby, Hendrika J.

1 Issue per year


SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 0.715
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 1.079

Stressors, Academic Performance, and Learned Resourcefulness in Baccalaureate Nursing Students

Anne-Marie Goff1

1University of North Carolina Wilmington,

Citation Information: International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship. Volume 8, Issue 1, ISSN (Online) 1548-923X, DOI: 10.2202/1548-923X.2114, January 2011

Publication History

Published Online:
2011-01-24

High stress levels in nursing students may affect memory, concentration, and problem-solving ability, and may lead to decreased learning, coping, academic performance, and retention. College students with higher levels of learned resourcefulness develop greater self-confidence, motivation, and academic persistence, and are less likely to become anxious, depressed, and frustrated, but no studies specifically involve nursing students. This explanatory correlational study used Gadzella’s Student-life Stress Inventory (SSI) and Rosenbaum’s Self Control Scale (SCS) to explore learned resourcefulness, stressors, and academic performance in 53 baccalaureate nursing students. High levels of personal and academic stressors were evident, but not significant predictors of academic performance (p = .90). Age was a significant predictor of academic performance (p = < .01) and males and African-American/Black participants had higher learned resourcefulness scores than females and Caucasians. Studies in larger, more diverse samples are necessary to validate these findings.

Keywords: stressors; academic performance; learned resourcefulness; nursing students

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