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Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Editor-in-Chief: Lui, Edmund

Ed. by Ko, Robert / Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin / Saunders, Paul / Suntres, Zacharias


SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2015: 0.401
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2015: 0.429
Impact per Publication (IPP) 2015: 1.255

49,00 € / $74.00 / £37.00*

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ISSN
1553-3840
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Inhalation of Neroli Essential Oil and Its Anxiolytic Effects

Ying-Ju Chen1 / Fuchou Cheng2 / Ying Shih3 / Tsong-Min Chang4 / Ming-Fu Wang5 / Sen-Sen Lan6

1Department of Food and Nutrition, Providence University, 433 Taichung, Taiwan

2Stem Cell Medical Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Taichung, Taiwan

3Department of Applied Cosmetology, HungKuang University, 433 Taichung, Taiwan

4Department of Applied Cosmetology, HungKuang University, 433 Taichung, Taiwan

5Departmentof Food and Nutrition, Providence University, 433 Taichung, Taiwan

6Stem Cell Medical Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Taichung, Taiwan

Citation Information: Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine. Volume 5, Issue 1, ISSN (Online) 1553-3840, DOI: 10.2202/1553-3840.1143, June 2008

Publication History

Published Online:
2008-06-20

In this study, gerbils were subjected to aromatherapy using inhaled neroli. Forced swimming tasks and locomotor activity were measured to evaluate levels of anxiety. Comparison was made between the duration time of the forced swimming tasks and total distance, and the duration time in the central and peripheral areas, between the control and neroli-inhaled groups. In addition, treatment with Xanax®, an anxiolytic drug, was used as a positive control. The average duration times for swimming were 228 ± 7, 439 ± 23, 386 ± 21, and 427 ± 18 seconds in the control, neroli-inhaled, and two Xanax-treated groups, respectively. The duration times were significantly increased by 65%-91% in neroli-inhaled, and the two Xanax-treated groups (p<0.01) when compared with the control. The total distances traveled during 30 min were 280 ± 25, 189 ± 11, and 168 ±18 m in the control, neroli-inhaled, and Xanax-treated groups, respectively. The duration times in the central area for the 30- min period were 493 ± 54, 476 ± 57, and 1014 ± 70 seconds in the control, neroli-inhaled, and Xanax-treated groups, respectively. In addition, the duration times in the peripheral area for the 30-min period were 1244 ± 66, 1324 ± 57, and 859 ±83 seconds in the control, neroli-inhaled, and Xanax-treated groups, respectively. The inhalation of neroli and the treatment of Xanax® had anxiolytic effects, as shown in both behavior tests. However, the mechanisms of anxiolytic effect responses for neroli and Xanax® were unclear. This study provides evidence-based data on aromatherapy using neroli in the treatment of anxiety.

Keywords: aromatherapy; forced swimming; locomotor activity; neroli; Xanax

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[1]
Clara Dobetsberger and Gerhard Buchbauer
Flavour and Fragrance Journal, 2011, Volume 26, Number 5, Page 300

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