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Libri

International Journal of Libraries and Information Studies

Editor-in-Chief: Albright, Kendra S. / Bothma, Theo J.D.


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All the World's a Stage – the Information Practices and Sense-Making of Theatre Professionals

Michael R. Olsson1

1Senior Lecturer, Journalism, Information and Media Studies Group, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. Email:

Citation Information: Libri. Volume 60, Issue 3, Pages 241–252, ISSN (Online) 1865-8423, ISSN (Print) 0024-2667, DOI: 10.1515/libr.2010.021, November 2010

Publication History

Received:
2010-10-09
Revised:
2010-02-14
Accepted:
2010-02-16
Published Online:
2010-11-04

Abstract

This paper reports on the findings of a study examining how theatre professionals (actors, directors and others) make sense of the works of a culturally iconic author (William Shakespeare). The study aims to address critique of prevailing approaches' excessive focus on active information seeking and searching (Julien, Where to from here? Results of an empirical study and user-centred implications for information design, Taylor Graham, 1999; Wilson, Informing Science 3: 49–55, 2000) by developing a more holistic approach, one which acknowledges the complexity of sense-making as more than the problem-solving behaviour of individuals – as an embodied, social process, involving emotion as well as rationality. In doing so it draws on theoretical approaches from a range of different disciplines and traditions, including Dervin's Sense-Making, Foucault's discourse analysis and Derrida's deconstructionism. The findings of the study are based on interviews with 35 theatre professionals in Canada, Finland and the UK.

Citing Articles

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[1]
Harriett E. Green and Rachel A. Fleming-May
The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 2015
[2]
Rachel A. Fleming-May and Harriett Green
Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 2015, Page n/a
[3]
Lisa A. Lazar
The Reference Librarian, 2013, Volume 54, Number 4, Page 263

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