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Linguistic Typology

Ed. by Plank, Frans

3 Issues per year

ERIH category 2011: INT1

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Chinese linguistics and typology: The state of the art

1Correspondence address:Centre de Recherches Linguistiques sur l'Asie Orientale, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS-CNRS), 54 Bd Raspail, 75270 Paris Cédex 06, France

2Correspondence address:Institute of Linguistics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, 5, Jiannei Dajie, 100732, Beijing, China

3Correspondence address:Centre de Recherches Linguistiques sur l'Asie Orientale, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS-CNRS), 54 Bd Raspail, 75270 Paris Cédex 06, France

Citation Information: Linguistic Typology. Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages 187–211, ISSN (Online) 1613-415X, ISSN (Print) 1430-0532, DOI: 10.1515/LINGTY.2007.014, July 2007

Publication History

Received:
2007-03-07
Published Online:
2007-07-31

Abstract

1. Introduction

China possesses rich linguistic resources which remain relatively untapped: the ten main Sinitic languages or dialect groups account for roughly 93% of the population (Mandarin, Jin, Xiang, Gan, Hui, Wu, Min, Kejia, Yue, and Pinghua); the remaining 7% comprise the many different “minority” languages in long term contact with Sinitic such as Tibeto-Burman, Mongolian, Hmong, and Tai. In an almost unprecedented state of affairs, written records for Chinese extend without a break 3,000 years into the past, furnishing a rich documentation for any kind of historical study.

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