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Radiology and Oncology

The Journal of Association of Radiology and Oncology

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Effectiveness of L-thyroxine treatment on TSH suppression during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation

Blaz Krhin1 / Nikola Besic1

Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia1

Department of Surgical Oncology, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia2

This content is open access.

Citation Information: Radiology and Oncology. Volume 46, Issue 2, Pages 160–165, ISSN (Online) 1581-3207, ISSN (Print) 1318-2099, DOI: 10.2478/v10019-012-0003-5, January 2012

Publication History

Published Online:
2012-01-02

Effectiveness of L-thyroxine treatment on TSH suppression during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation

Introduction. There are scarce data about the optimal increase of L-thyroxine dose during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma. The first aim of the study was to find out if routine therapeutic measures enable adequate TSH suppression in pregnancy. The other aim was to find out the optimal dose of L-thyroxine for TSH suppression in pregnant women.

Patients and methods. In this retrospective observational study, we analysed 36 pregnancies of 32 women with a history of thyroid carcinoma. Before pregnancy, all of them underwent total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnant, and they were on suppressive doses of L-thyroxine. Thyroid function tests were obtained before, during and after pregnancy.

Results. Mean L-thyroxine dose before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 149, 147, 155, 165 and 158 micrograms daily, respectively. TSH concentration remained suppressed in 9 pregnancies, it was within normal range in 22 and elevated in 5 pregnancies. The mean dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 154, 154, 164, 160 and 161 micrograms daily, respectively. When the dose had to be changed, the mean increase of the dose was 31.5 micrograms daily.

Conclusions. The range of changes in TSH concentration during pregnancy in the patients who have been on suppressive L-thyroxine therapy before conception is quite wide. TSH was adequately suppressed in only 25% of pregnancies. The dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH in the first, second and third trimester was 154, 164 and 160 micrograms daily, respectively.

Keywords: pregnancy; TSH suppression; L-thyroxine; thyroid carcinoma

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