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Reviews in the Neurosciences

Editor-in-Chief: Huston, Joseph P.

Editorial Board Member: Topic, Bianca / Adeli, Hojjat / Buzsaki, Gyorgy / Crawley, Jacqueline / Crow, Tim / Eichenbaum, Howard / Gold, Paul / Holsboer, Florian / Korth, Carsten / Lubec, Gert / McEwen, Bruce / Pan, Weihong / Pletnikov, Mikhail / Robbins, Trevor / Schnitzler, Alfons / Stevens, Charles / Steward, Oswald / Trojanowski, John

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IMPACT FACTOR increased in 2014: 3.330
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Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

Muhammad A. Parvaz1 / Nelly Alia-Klein1 / Patricia A. Woicik1 / Nora D. Volkow2 / 1

1Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 30 Bell Ave., Bldg. 490, Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA

2National Institute of Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Corresponding author

Citation Information: Reviews in the Neurosciences. Volume 22, Issue 6, Pages 609–624, ISSN (Online) 2191-0200, ISSN (Print) 0334-1763, DOI: 10.1515/RNS.2011.055, November 2011

Publication History

Received:
2011-11-03
Accepted:
2011-11-05
Published Online:
2011-11-25

Abstract

In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

Keywords: dopamine; electroencephalography (EEG); event-related potentials (ERPs); magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); positron emission tomography (PET); prefrontal cortex

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