Fetal and neonatal outcome in patients with anterior abdominal wall defects (gastroschisis and omphalocele)

Ingolf Juhasz-Böss, Rangmar Goelz 2 , Erich-Franz Solomayer, Jörg Fuchs 3  and Gabriele Meyberg-Solomayer
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Saarland, Homburg/Saar, Germany
  • 2 Department of Neonatology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • 3 Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • 4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Abstract

Fetuses with gastroschisis and omphalocele frequently show intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The aim of our study was to evaluate the intrauterine course of IUGR and the neonatal outcome in a large patient collective. We retrospectively included all euploid fetuses with gastroschisis and omphalocele between 2001 and 2009 in a single tertiary center. Patients’ characteristics, serial ultrasound examinations and neonatal outcomes were evaluated. From 39 fetuses (28 gastroschisis, 11 omphalocele) 61.5% had IUGR <5th percentile and 15.4% had IUGR<10th percentile. The rate of IUGR did not differ significantly between the two groups during pregnancy. Newborns with gastroschisis showed an average weight of 2386 g, and those with omphalocele showed an average weight of 3148 g (P<0.001). Nevertheless, newborns with omphalocele were more frequently eutrophic than those with gastroschisis (88.8% vs. 52.2%, P=0.079). On average, only one surgical intervention was necessary for the definitive repair of the defect (65.5% of the newborns). Children with gastroschisis remained hospitalized nearly twice as long as children with an omphalocele (38 vs. 20 days). IUGR rates during pregnancy did not differ significantly between fetuses with gastroschisis and omphalocele although patients with defects of omphalocele were more frequently eutrophic at birth. Most newborns needed only one operation for definitive surgical treatment. The mean hospitalization time after this intervention was 4 weeks.

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