Value of cervicovaginal fluid cytokines in prediction of fetal inflammatory response syndrome in pregnancies complicated with preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM)

Mateusz MikołajczykORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4599-7003, Przemysław Wirstlein
  • Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland
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, Magdalena Adamczyk
  • Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland
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, Jana Skrzypczak
  • Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland
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and Ewa Wender-Ożegowska
  • Department of Reproduction, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland
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Abstract

Background

Preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM) is associated with a high risk of prematurity and complications of fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). The aim of the study is to determine any correlations between the concentration of selected cytokines contained in the cervicovaginal secretion eluates and in the umbilical cord plasma in patients with pPROM and to find the noninvasive markers of FIRS in order to pinpoint the optimal time of the delivery.

Methods

The study included 80 patients with pPROM between the 24th and 34th week of gestation. The cervicovaginal fluid and umbilical cord blood were collected. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin 19 (IL-19) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations were measured in both materials. For the statistical analysis, SigmaStat3.5 software was used.

Results

There was no direct association in levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-19 between the cord blood and cervicovaginal secretions within the studied group. The cut-off point of IL-6 of 26.8 pg/mL in the vaginal fluid had high sensitivity and specificity in order to discriminate between newborns with and without FIRS (81.08%; 76.74%).

Conclusion

Further studies are needed on a larger group of participants to demonstrate that an elevated concentration of IL-6 above 26.8 pg/mL in the cervicovaginal secretion eluate is an indirect noninvasive marker of FIRS.

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