Obstetric outcomes of pregnancy complicated by urolithiasis: a retrospective cohort study

Emily K. Clennon MD, MPHhttp://orcid.org/https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0012-0785 1 , Bharti Garg 1 , Brian D. Duty 1 , and Aaron B. Caughey 1
  • 1 Oregon Health & Science University, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, Portland, USA
Emily K. ClennonORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0012-0785, Bharti Garg
  • Oregon Health & Science University, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, Portland, OR, USA
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, Brian D. Duty
  • Oregon Health & Science University, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, Portland, OR, USA
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and Aaron B. Caughey
  • Oregon Health & Science University, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Urology, Portland, OR, USA
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  • degruyter.comGoogle Scholar

Abstract

Objectives

Evaluate the association between urolithiasis during pregnancy and obstetric outcomes outside the context of urological intervention.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective cohort study of singleton, non-anomalous gestations delivered at 23–42 weeks in California from 2007 to 2011. Maternal outcomes (preterm delivery [early (<32 weeks) and late (<37 weeks)], preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, cesarean deliveries, urinary tract infection [UTI] at delivery, chorioamnionitis, endomyometritis, and maternal sepsis) and newborn outcomes (seizure, respiratory distress syndrome, hypoglycemia, jaundice, and neonatal abstinence syndrome [NAS]) were compared using χ2-tests and multivariable logistic regression.

Results

A total of 2,013,767 pregnancies met inclusion criteria, of which 5,734 (0.28%) were complicated by urolithiasis. Stone disease during pregnancy was associated with 30% greater odds of each early (aOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19–1.43) and late (aOR 1.29; 95% CI 1.18–1.41) preterm delivery. Cesarean delivery, UTI at delivery, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and sepsis were all significantly positively associated with urolithiasis. Odds of NAS (aOR 2.11; 95% CI 1.27–3.51) and jaundice were significantly greater in the neonates of stone-forming patients (aOR 1.08; 95% CI 1.01–1.16).

Conclusions

Urolithiasis during pregnancy was associated with 30% greater odds of preterm delivery and increased risk of myriad metabolic, hypertensive, and infectious disorders of gestation. Neonates born to stone-forming patients were more than twice as likely to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome but did not have significantly greater odds of complications of prematurity.

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