Individualized sex-specific birth weight percentiles for gestational age based on maternal height and weight

Manfred Voigt 1 , 10 , Niels Rochow 2 , 3 , 4 , Erin Landau-Crangle 5 , Lena Marie Meyer-Kahrweg 3 , Dirk M. Olbertz 6 , Mirjam Kunze 1 , Werner Nikischin 7 , Ursula Wittwer-Backofen 10 , Markus Rochow 8 , Jan Däbritz 3 , and Roland Hentschel 9
  • 1 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Freiburg School of Medicine, Freiburg, Germany
  • 2 Department of Pediatrics, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany
  • 3 Department of Pediatrics, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
  • 5 School of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada
  • 6 Neonatology, Clinic Südstadt, Rostock, Germany
  • 7 Institute of Emergency Medicine, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • 8 Carl-Thiem-Hospital, Cottbus, Germany
  • 9 Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Neonatology/Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital, Freiburg, Germany
  • 10 Biological Anthropology, Medical Faculty, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
Manfred Voigt
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Freiburg School of Medicine, Freiburg, Germany
  • Biological Anthropology, Medical Faculty, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
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, Niels Rochow
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Pediatrics, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany
  • Department of Pediatrics, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany
  • Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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, Erin Landau-Crangle, Lena Marie Meyer-Kahrweg, Dirk M. Olbertz, Mirjam Kunze
  • Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Freiburg School of Medicine, Freiburg, Germany
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, Werner Nikischin, Ursula Wittwer-Backofen
  • Biological Anthropology, Medical Faculty, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
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, Markus Rochow, Jan Däbritz and Roland Hentschel
  • Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Neonatology/Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital, Freiburg, Germany
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Abstract

Objectives

The maternal body size affects birth weight. The impact on birth weight percentiles is unknown. The objective of the study was to develop birth weight percentiles based on maternal height and weight.

Methods

This observational study analyzed 2.2 million singletons from the German Perinatal Survey. Data were stratified into 18 maternal height and weight groups. Sex-specific birth weight percentiles were calculated from 31 to 42 weeks and compared to percentiles from the complete dataset using the GAMLSS package for R statistics.

Results

Birth weight percentiles not considering maternal size showed 22% incidence of small for gestational age (SGA) and 2% incidence of large for gestational age (LGA) for the subgroup of newborns from petite mothers, compared to a 4% SGA and 26% LGA newborns from big mothers. The novel percentiles based on 18 groups stratified by maternal height and weight for both sexes showed significant differences between identical original percentiles. The differences were up to almost 800 g between identical percentiles for petite and big mothers. The 97th and 50th percentile from the group of petite mothers almost overlap with the 50th and 3rd percentile from the group of big mothers.

Conclusions

There is a clinically significant difference in birth weight percentiles when stratified by maternal height and weight. It could be hypothesized that birth weight charts stratified by maternal anthropometry could provide higher specificity and more individual prediction of perinatal risks. The new percentiles may be used to evaluate estimated fetal as well as birth weight.

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