Predictors of Academic-Related Stress in College Students: An Examination of Coping, Social Support, Parenting, and Anxiety

Kimberly Renk and Tara Smith

This study examined potential predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. In particular, the relationships among the coping strategies used by college students, social support, the parenting style used by college students’ mothers and fathers, college students’ experience of anxiety, and academic-related stress were examined. Ninety-three undergraduate students enrolled in a psychology course at a large southeastern university completed a series of self-report questionnaires that measured the variables under study. Results suggested that anxiety, problem-focused coping, and support from significant others may serve as potentially important predictors of the academic-related stress experienced by college students. Thus, identifying college students’ experience with these variables and addressing these variables in practical settings may help college students alleviate their experience of academic-related stress and have a less stressful, and possibly more fulfilling, college career.

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