Evaluation of prolidase activity in uremic bone disease

Arzu Kösem 1 , Elmas Öğüş 2 , Murat Duranay 3  and Doğan Yücel 2
  • 1 Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Altındağ, Ankara, Turkey
  • 2 Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Ankara, Turkey
  • 3 Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Ankara, Turkey
Arzu Kösem, Elmas Öğüş, Murat Duranay and Doğan Yücel

Abstract

Background:

In this study, we planned to evaluate the comparison of serum prolidase activity with other biochemical markers.

Methods:

The patient group was consisted of totally 73 patients with 21 male and 18 female who were diagnosed as chronic renal failure (CRF) and were undergoing peritoneal dialysis while 21 male and 13 female who were undergoing hemodialysis. The control group was composed of 54 healthy volunteers, including 25 men and 29 women. Serum and erythrocyte prolidase activities were measured in both patient and control groups and the relationship between serum prolidase activities and metabolic markers of bone (osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, calcitonin, vitamin D and parathormone) were compared in both groups.

Results:

There was a significant difference between the serum prolidase activity of peritoneal dialysis and pre-hemodialysis groups as compared with the control group (p<0.05). Serum prolidase activity of the pre-hemodialysis group was lower than that of post-hemodialysis group and there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). There was a significant difference between prolidase activities in erythrocytes of prehemodialysis and control groups (p<0.05).

Conclusion:

Kidney is the most prolidase-rich tissue in the human body. According to our results, the prolidase activity decreased in CRF; and the level of decrement was independent from the hemodialysis procedure.

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Turkish Journal of Biochemistry (TJB), official journal of Turkish Biochemical Society, is issued electronically every 2 months. The main aim of the journal is to support the research and publishing culture by ensuring that every published manuscript has an added value and thus providing international acceptance of the “readability” of the manuscripts published in the journal.

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