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Abstract

This second article (in a series of six), presents an examination of the existing conditions that limit access to Peirce’s corpus, and offers some detailed account of what reasoning technology could be used to improve these conditions. Peirce’s theory of recursive inquiry, relying on his pragmatism, gives us the basis for designing technology to support effective access to his archive, and to pursue future improvement by developing a crowdsourced community of inquiry for continuing semiosis.

Abstract

This chapter is a short thematic introduction to the papers that appear in this special volume on the phonetics and phonology of a selective but representative set of languages from the South Asian sprachbund. The volume consists of five papers that engage with a broad set of topics, namely, acoustics of Kalasha affricates, perception of breathiness in Gujarati, syllable structure of Kuki-Chin, syllable structure and incipient vowels in Lamkang, and vowel harmony in Assamese. These papers, we hope, are representative in terms of the choice of theoretical frameworks and methodologies employed in addressing the various linguistic phenomena.

Abstract

Jakobson’s article “On linguistic aspects of translation” proposes a tripartite division of translation as intralingual, interlingual, and intersemiotic, which offers a panorama of a semiotic approach to translation, especially to what is translation in a multileveled sense. Subsequent scholars develop the two implicit ideas in his article, named by the author as “translation as sign transformation” and “translation as sign interpretation.” While further widening the scope and enriching the perspective of Jakobson’s typology, current literature remains purely theoretical in essence. As a particular research area, cultural terminology translation could serve as the axis linking theory and practice, which becomes the primary concern for this paper. Grounded on a review of Jakobson’s division and related literature in translation semiotics, this study proposes a multileveled understanding of cultural terminology translation based on some concrete cases. Cultural terminology translation is regarded as “sign transformation” and “sign interpretation.” As sign transformation, it concerns the transformation of conceptual, linguistic, and cultural signs, while as sign interpretation, it goes from intralingual to interlingual to intersemiotic interpretation. This research concludes that cultural terminology translation is a complex sign activity calling for further investigations.

Abstract

The Kuki-Chin group of the Tibeto-Burman language family consists of upwards of 50 languages spoken mainly in western Myanmar, predominantly in Chin State and in neighboring areas of India and Bangladesh (Simons & Fennig (eds.). 2019. Ethnologue: Languages of the world, 21st edn. Dallas Texas: SIL International. Online version. http://www.ethnologue.com/). In the many daughter languages of Proto–Kuki-Chin, syllable structure simplification has yielded a synchronic situation in which individual languages are spread along a cline ranging from more conservative languages, some with complex onsets and vowel length distinctions, to more innovative languages, some with no coda consonants at all. The distribution and phonetic realization of these features vary across the Kuki-Chin group, raising a number of relevant questions about the underlying phonological representations of the Kuki-Chin syllable. This paper surveys representative structures from a variety of Kuki-Chin languages in order to highlight issues in syllable structure across these little-studied languages. In doing so, we aim to both unify observations on Kuki-Chin phonology related to the syllable, and to propose research that will further elucidate its structures.