SEARCH CONTENT

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,148 items :

  • Entrepreneurship x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
Clear All
Configuring search and select processes to avoid disruption
Capitalism. Democracy. Rule of Law

Abstract

Social entrepreneurship (SE) has gained prominence in recent years, becoming a primary field of study and providing rich research opportunities that are both challenging and intriguing. This paper seeks to fill the knowledge gap in this field by improving the understanding of business models of SE and, more specifically, investigating how social entrepreneurs design their business models in order to create both social and economic value. Using the abductive approach method, the paper explores a single case study that enquires about the business model of the social enterprise named “La Paranza Cooperative”, located in southern Italy and operating in the cultural heritage industry. Our main theoretical contribution lies in illustrating and formalising the ambidexterity perspective through which social enterprises simultaneously pursue goals that are apparently contradictory, such as economic and social ones. Furthermore, on the practical side, we assess the win–win managerial mechanisms that benefit social enterprises through their external environment as a bundle of distinctive resources while contributing to its requalification. Finally, our explorative study opens-up for deeper and more detailed future research on the business model of SE.

Abstract

Even though family firms are characterized by an overlap between the family and business systems, family business research has focused separately on how family firms compete (i. e., strategic behavior) and how families are involved their firms (i. e., types of family orientation). With the aim of closing this research gap, we draw on the heterogeneity principle of family firms and the equifinality principle of the configurative approach to conjecture that family firms can successfully adjust their strategic behavior and family business orientation in a variety of ways to enhance their likelihood of survival. We follow a sample of Spanish family firms over an 11-year period (2004–2015) to test our model. Based on the Kaplan–Meier survival estimator and the Cox proportional hazard model, we find that survival likelihood is higher when firms combine a differentiation strategy with a business-first or a family-enterprise-first orientation or when firms follow a low-cost strategy with a family-first orientation.

Abstract

This study aims to measure and investigates the mediating effect of business incubators (BIs) and the influence of training programs, capital support, and networking services on sustainable entrepreneurship growth (SEG). A mediated conceptual model is constructed to simplify the effect and influences of variables taken in this study. A quantitative research method is employed on a sample size of 567. A survey questionnaire was used as an instrument to collect data from incubator centers and entrepreneurs. The method of bootstrapping, partial least squares (software 3.2.8) Algorithms, and structural equation models were used. In findings, the positive and significant influence of networking services, capital support, and training programs were identified on SEG. Also, the relationship between networking services, capital support, training programs, and SEG was mediated by BIs.

Abstract

This article aims at delivering new theoretical interpretation and quantitative evidence concerning the emergence and development of social enterprises (SEs) in Italy. Where the former is concerned the article seeks to provide the core features necessary to identify when an organization can be defined as a SE. In particular, the analysis retraces the steps back to the intersection between “classical” studies on entrepreneurial non-profit organizations and the more recent literature on entrepreneurial action and social responsibility for the business enterprise. The institutional and quantitative analysis then focuses on the development of SEs in Italy, discussing the institutional evolution of the new legal forms, and the principal area of activity of SEs in Italy. This country represents a key player in the evolution of SEs as it pioneered legislation and practice in Europe and the emerging new frontier for modeling different types of SEs.

Abstract

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) are the most relevant and recent attempt to integrate sustainable development ambitions and environmental concerns in a policy framework. Recently, few studies have been conducted to investigate the gap between sustainability reporting and the SDGs, initiating a new stream of research (Lozano 2015; Rosati and Faria 2019). However, the role of accounting systems as a support for moving toward goals and targets outlined by the SDGs has been poorly deepened in not-traditional profit-oriented businesses. Among these, there are cooperatives: jointly owned benefit corporations. The peculiarity of cooperatives lays in the collective governance and the fact that profits are re-invested in the cooperative or in local projects and activities rather than being distributed to the shareholders. The present study intends to fill this gap by answering the following research question: can a cooperative, given its peculiar nature, contribute to sustainability? To do so, the annual sustainability reports of the largest Italian cooperative have been analyzed under the lens of SDGs. The results show that cooperatives can actively contribute to sustainability, especially on the local level. In fact, they have proved to be important players in transposing the SDGs from the national level to the local level, constituting an important link between the international community and the local one.

Abstract

Many family firms hire and rely on non-family employees; therefore, the mutual benefits provided to both family and non-family members are important. Yet, the perspectives of non-family employees have been under researched. Drawing upon organizational identity and justice theories and the extant literature on family influence, this study examines non-family employees’ perceived family influence, family firm identification, family firm justice, and turnover intentions in a sample of 301 family business non-family employees. Path analysis results show that non-family employees’ perceived family influence can lead to family firm identification, in turn diminishing their turnover intentions. We also find that non-family employees’ perceptions of family firm justice moderate the relationship between non-family employees’ perceived family influence and family firm identification. We conclude by discussing implications.

Abstract

This paper applies the assumptions of self-determination theory to study social entrepreneurial intention. We suggest that motivational forces, identified as autonomous and controlled, affect an individual’s intention to start a social venture. The study extends the social entrepreneurial intention research by examining the effect of prosocial and intrinsic motivations on an individual’s inclination to become a social entrepreneur and by testing the role of gender. Prosocial and intrinsic motivations are found to positively affect social entrepreneurial intention of individuals. Furthermore, females have demonstrated to be more influenced by the combination of motivational factors compared to males.

Abstract

The study empirically contributes to the discussion on the effects of start-up subsidies for unemployed individuals as a part of the active labour market policy. The article provides insights into the survival and performance of the subsidized businesses in the Czech Republic. The study follows up cohorts of self-employed individuals that were supported during years 2009–2017. The obtained findings show that a vast majority of the supported businesses were still officially active 2 years after the allocation of the start-up subsidy, and even later. The firm-level data further relieve that most of the individuals starting a business out of unemployment stay solo (only less than four per cent of self-employed individuals employ besides themselves at least one employee) and the economic outcomes of the subsidized businesses, measured as annual turnover, are rather modest. The empirical results further showed that higher intensity of public support is negatively associated with business closure and positively with employment and turnover categories. The study concludes that the start-up subsidy for unemployed succeeded in activating unemployed individuals to pursue an economic activity, although further research concerning other outcome variables such as personal income, job satisfaction and well-being is needed.