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Zugänge und Beispiele
Elemente einer Kulturtheorie häuslicher Müllentsorgung
Overfishing in the North Atlantic since 1880

Abstract

European dried gardens from the 16th century have been traditionally associated with the emergence of early modern botany and its relation to the traditional genre of pharmacopeias. This study reviews a sample of the 37 known exemplars of these bound collections and argues that the design and development of these herbaria or dried gardens (orti sicci), as they were also known, reveal a broader set of questions on nature and about the relationships of humans with the natural world than the ones with which they have been linked. Based on the evidence of a diverse corpus of dried gardens—some richly bound, others composed over recycled paper, some with copious annotations, others with a seemingly random layout and distribution of plants—, this paper argues for a comparative reading of these books as a corpus that contributed significantly to early modern natural history and philosophy.

Abstract

The first two public gardens in Bucharest, as well as some of the oldest in the South and East regions of nowadays country of Romania, were designed, built and planted around the mid-nineteenth century by a German-born landscape gardener named Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Meyer. These two public gardens were designed according to modern nineteenth century landscaping concepts and were planted with exotic species of flowers, shrubs and trees not common at that time either in Bucharest or anywhere in the Romanian provinces south or east of the Carpathians. To better understand the design, development, and meaning of these gardens, this paper aims to analyze the specific palette of ornamental species of plants and the planting patterns that were used for the Kiseleff and Cișmigiu gardens in Bucharest and to outline the importance of their use.

Abstract

The article investigates Renaissance naturalists’ views on the links between plants and places where they grow. It looks at the Renaissance culture of botanical excursions and observation of plants in their natural environment and analyses the methods Renaissance naturalists used to describe relations between plants and their habitat, the influence of location on plants’ substantial and accidental characteristics, and in defining species. I worked mostly with printed sixteenth-century botanical sources and paid special attention to the work of Italian naturalist Giambattista Della Porta (1535–1615), whose thoughts on the relationship between plants and places are original, yet little known.

Abstract

Gardens are generally associated with places that are aesthetically pleasing and perceived as promoters of social engagement within the community. Furthermore, gardens are believed to improve both the individuals’ physical and psychological state of mind. However, and contrary to the previous statements, gardens may also sometimes turn into a site of agony. One such example has been explored in this article- the tea gardens of India during the nineteenth century, where their inhabitants faced a cholera pandemic. The gardens infected with cholera led to a high mortality rate in the region. This article discusses the causes that led to the cholera outbreak in India and how it spread throughout the region, causing tea gardens to turn into ailing gardens. Moreover, emphasis has also been laid on the role of tea gardens as laboratories where vaccine administration against cholera was performed.