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The Language of Pitcairn Island and Norfolk Island

Abstract

The current study explored the second language acquisition (SLA) difficulties that 45 Syrian refugees and asylum seekers encountered in nine countries (Germany, Turkey, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, France, Malay, Austria, and Romania) that they fled to away from the ongoing war in Syria. The study also sought to elicit the solutions for these difficulties from the participants’ views. This research employed interviews and an open-ended questionnaire utilizing the Facebook Messenger application to gather data. The study builds on and broadens the scope of language acquisition research and questions main SLA theoretical underpinnings. The study found a variety of difficulties pertinent to economic, personal, social, linguistic, temporal, and psychological factors. The participants’ recommendations were classified into refugee-based, community-based, and authority-based ones.

Abstract

School counselors play an integral role in supporting students academically, socially, and emotionally. However, due to various demands, school counselors often face time constraints that limit them from providing social and emotional support to students at the secondary level. In this case study, an analysis of qualitative interviews with 13 high school students and 20 administrators who participated in a student voice initiative in a large, urban school district showed that participating students gained social and analytic skills, and the initiative produced a more positive school climate. These outcomes align with those articulated in school counseling standards. Throughout the article, the researchers discuss a student voice initiative that was implemented district-wide, outcomes from the research study pertaining to the intervention, and implications for school counseling practices to support student voice initiatives at the secondary level.

Abstract

The expanding hegemony of English caused English Language Teaching to suddenly turn into an international business with huge financial investment, and accordingly produced EFL textbooks evolved into a cornerstone of the business. Further, studies on the relation between ideology, hegemony, and textbooks have multiplied in recent decades as a result of the rise of critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical thinking skills which have inspired scholars to establish a critical perspective towards EFL textbooks considering the compounds of ideology and hegemony. In this paper, using a mixed method research design, qualitatively collected data through interviews and quantitatively gathered data through a questionnaire aimed to reveal the views of teachers/instructors and learners about the ideological and hegemonic practices contained in the EFL textbooks. The results of questionnaire and interview showed that ideology and hegemony are closely related to each other. Moreover, it is hard to give a clear-cut definition of these two terms because both textbooks and participants often used these two terms interchangeably. However, the participants declared diverse views on the underlying ideology and hegemonic practices in globally and locally written EFL textbooks.

Abstract

While linguistic prejudice is commonly understood to concern individuals or social groups because of the way they speak, we can also see it as damaging language used about individuals or social groups. In this article, I start by looking at the traditional sociolinguistic understanding of linguistic prejudice, then go on to look rather widely at various forms of prejudicial/sexist language about women. In doing so, I identify various lexical asymmetries and associated “lexical gaps”. The main part of the article takes this further by exploring how certain insults to men draw on an understood prejudice again women. I illustrate this with a “telling case”: three naturally occurring examples of prejudicial, sexist language recently used by British prime minister Boris Johnson: big girl’s blouse, man up and girly swot. For all three to work, they draw on what we might call a discourse of “Women as ineffectual”. I conclude with a discussion of intentionality as regards this sort of prejudicial language use, what it is intended to achieve and how it can be resisted.

Abstract

“The Language of Rhetorical Feminism, Anchored in Hope” honors contemporary expansions of rhetoric in terms of theory, practitioners, and practices. I’ve forged a new pathway that begins at the nexus of rhetoric, feminism, and hope, a juncture where the traditionally disregarded rhetorical practices and powers of so-called Others can be appreciated for their potency. Their purposeful resistant rhetorical praxes provide the constituent features of a theory I call “rhetorical feminism.” My hope is that the best parts of these rhetorical feminist praxes will meld with the best parts of rhetoric writ large.

Abstract

This article presents an overview of the numeral system in Akebu, a Kwa language of Togo. The Akebu numeral system is a decimal one and contains simple numerals from ‘1’ to ‘9’ and decimal bases for ‘10’, ‘100’, and ‘1,000’. The former have noun class agreement markers, while the latter do not. Only some noun classes are compatible with numerals, but among them there are both plural and singular classes.