SEARCH CONTENT

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 206 items :

  • Biochemistry x
Clear All
Series: De Gruyter STEM

Abstract

Metal ions are indispensable for living organisms. However, the roles of metal ions in humans is complex, and remains poorly understood. Imbalances in metal ion levels, due to genetic or environmental sources, are associated with a number of significant health issues. However, in clinical medicine, the role of metal ions and metal-based drugs is notable in three major areas: as metal-related diseases; as metal-based medicines (including drugs, imaging agents, and metal chelators); and as agents of metal-based toxicity.

Abstract

Manganese is an essential dietary element that functions primarily as a coenzyme in several biological processes. These processes include, but are not limited to, macronutrient metabolism, bone formation, free radical defense systems, and in the brain, ammonia clearance and neurotransmitter synthesis. It is a critical component in dozens of proteins and enzymes, and is found in all tissues. Concentrated levels of Mn are found in tissues rich in mitochondria and melanin, with both, liver, and pancreas having the highest concentrations under normal conditions. However, overexposure to environmental Mn via industrial occupation or contaminated drinking water can lead to toxic brain Mn accumulation that has been associated with neurological impairment. The objective of this chapter is to address the biological importance of Mn (essentiality), routes of exposure, factors dictating Mn status, a brief discussion of Mn neurotoxicity, and proposed methods for neurotoxicity remediation.

Abstract

The use of metals in medicine has grown impressively in recent years as a result of greatly advanced understanding of biologically active metal complexes and metal-containing proteins. One landmark in this area was the introduction of cisplatin and related derivatives as anticancer drugs. As the body of literature continues to expand, it is necessary to inspect sub-classes of this group with more acute detail. This chapter will review preclinical research of cobalt complexes coordinated by Schiff base ligands. Cobalt-Schiff base complexes have a wide variety of potential therapeutic functions, including as antimicrobials, anticancer agents, and inhibitors of protein aggregation. While providing a broad introduction to this class of agents, this chapter will pay particular attention to agents for which mechanisms of actions have been studied. Appropriate methods to assess activity of these complexes will be reviewed, and promising preclinical complexes in each of the following therapeutic areas will be highlighted: antimicrobial, antiviral, cancer therapy, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Abstract

Copper is an essential trace element that plays a critical role in a variety of basic biological functions, and serves as a key component in a number of copper-dependent enzymes that regulate such processes as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and motility. A growing body of preclinical work has demonstrated that copper is essential to metastatic cancer progression, and may have a role in tumor growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and the formation of the tumor microenvironment and pre-metastatic niche. As a result, copper depletion has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of metastatic cancer. We present a review of the physiologic role of copper with a discussion of relevant enzymes of the copper proteome in both normal tissue and in cancer. We conducted a comprehensive review of the available preclinical data of several copper chelation agents, including penicillamine, trientine, disulfiram, clioquinol, and tetrathiomolybdate (TM), across a variety of tumor types. We also present the existing early phase clinical trial data for the use of the copper chelator TM in the treatment of breast cancer and other malignancies.

Abstract

Metal compounds seem to be a promising approach in the search of new therapeutic solutions for neglected tropical diseases. In this chapter, efforts in the design of prospective metal-based drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis, and leishmaniasis are discussed. Careful selection of the metal center (including organometallic cores) and the types and number of coordinated ligands is essential for controlling the reactivity of the complexes and hence, tuning their biological properties. In a target-based approach, some targets that have been validated for organic antiparasitic compounds are expected to remain targets for metal complexes of these compounds. In addition, specific targets for metal compounds, like parasitic enzymes or DNA, would also be included for these metal complexes leading to potential additive or even synergistic effects between organic ligand and metal ion. However, even though a good number of prospective antiparasitic metal-based drugs have been developed, further systematic efforts are needed for these metal compounds to accomplish the regulatory guidelines that let them reach the different stages of clinical trials.

Abstract

Physiological metabolism of cyanide takes place by a single major pathway that forms non-toxic thiocyanate that is subsequently excreted. Rhodanese is the primary enzyme to execute metabolism of cyanide with minor pathways from other sulfurtransferases in vivo. The rhodanese enzyme depends on sulfur donor availability to metabolize cyanide and poisoning occurs at elevated cyanide concentrations in vivo. Cyanide interacts with over 40 metalloenzymes, but its lethal action is non-competitive inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, halting cellular respiration and causing hypoxic anoxia. Only a handful of antidotes for treatment of cyanide poisoning are known; they are primarily inorganic compounds and metal complexes which are intended to intercept cyanide before it inhibits cellular respiration. The inorganic compounds manipulate hemoglobin, forming methemoglobin, or supply sulfur for the rhodanese enzyme. The metal complexes intercept the cyanide and bind it before reaching its target. Cobalt complexes of corrins and vitamin B12 derivatives are the state-of-the-art agents, while the longest employed complex, Co2EDTA, is designed to deliver “free” cobalt for binding of cyanide. Compounds that are in development are discussed from the point of how they are designed to intercept cyanide. The challenge of reversing the cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase is based on the catalytic active site structure and reactivity. General information about history and occurrence of poisoning and clinical symptoms is discussed and the challenges related to analytical methods available to analyze blood cyanide levels and to confirm the presence of cyanide poisoning.

Abstract

With the impressive development of molecular life sciences, one may have the feeling that biopharmaceuticals will dominate the world of drug design and production. This is partly due to the evolution of pharmaceutical industry, especially since the 1980s. As a matter of fact, small molecules are still dominating the field of drug innovation, in contradiction with claims predicting their downfall and the exponential raise of biopharmaceuticals. The strong association of chemistry with biochemistry and pharmacology has been the scientific base of the establishment and the success of strong powerful pharmaceutical companies throughout the twentieth century. To meet the needs of new therapeutic agents, it is necessary to assess the role and future position of medicinal chemistry. In fact, the reasonable balance between small molecules and biopharmaceuticals will depend on scientific and economic factors, including the goal of having highly efficient drugs to cure the largest possible number of patients, at a cost that is compatible with the limits of national health budgets. In the present chapter, we would like to emphasize the future important role of small molecules based on new chemicals, to build a new portfolio of efficient, safe and affordable drugs to solve major therapeutic challenges. Two examples are then given. In the blood parasitic diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis, the iron of heme is an “old” and relevant therapeutic target to kill the parasite. Investigations on the mechanism of action of the antimalarial endoperoxide sesquiterpene artemisinin, have paved the way to the design of new efficient synthetic endoperoxide drugs. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, the loss of copper homeostasis in patient brain is one of the key features of neurodegeneration. The development of small copper specific ligands able to retrieve copper from its pathological sinks to reintroduce it into physiological circulation is a challenging but promising approach to effective therapy.

Abstract

This chapter is devoted to the chelation treatment of transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients. After a brief overview on the pathophysiology of iron overload and on the methods to quantify it in different organs, the chelation therapy is discussed, giving particular attention to the chemical and biomedical requisites. The main tasks of an iron chelator should be the scavenging of excess iron, allowing an equilibrium between iron supplied by transfusions and that removed with chelation, and protection of the individual from the poisonous effects of circulating iron. The chelating agents in clinical use are presented, illustrating the main chemical and pharmacological features, together with a comparative cost analysis of their treatments. As a final section, an overview is provided on chelators undergoing clinical trials, and on research in progress.

Abstract

Our understanding of the broad principles of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis in man are well established with the exception of the brain. Most of the proteins involved in mammalian iron metabolism are present in the brain, although their distribution and precise roles in iron uptake, intracellular metabolism and export are still uncertain, as is the way in which systemic iron is transferred across the blood-brain barrier. We briefly review current concepts concerning the uptake and distribution of iron in the brain, before turning to the ways in which brain iron homeostasis might be regulated. The distribution of iron between different brain regions is then discussed as is the increase in brain iron with normal aging, and the different forms in which iron is present. The increased levels of iron found in specific brain regions and their potential contribution to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease and other polyglutamine expansion diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, as well as a number of neurodegenerative diseases with iron accumulation, are discussed. The interactions between neuroinflammation and iron are presented, and the chapter concludes with a review of current clinical studies and discussion of the potential and efficacy of iron chelation therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.