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Abstract

With large text collections for Ancient Greek and Latin now widely available, classicists are increasingly interested in extracting information systematically from these texts. The fields of information retrieval and natural language processing offer tools and methods to address this, but classical-language support can be limited and researchers must often cobble together separate, sometimes incompatible tools to accomplish basic text analysis tasks. In this chapter, I review the tools currently available for digital philological work on Ancient Greek and Latin and introduce the Classical Language Toolkit, an open-source Python framework that addresses the desideratum of a complete text analysis pipeline for historical languages.

Abstract

Starting with the project A Library of a Billion Words (ESF 100146395) and ongoing in the Big Data related project Scalable Data Solutions (BMBF 01IS14014B), the NLP group in Leipzig was tasked to develop a feature complete and generic implementation of the Canonical Text Services (CTS) protocol that is able to handle billions of words. This paper describes how this goal was achieved and why this is a significant step forward for the communities of humanists and computer scientists who work with text data.

Abstract

Underlying any processing and analysis of texts is the need to represent the individual characters that make up those texts. For the first few decades, scholars pioneering digital classical philology had to adopt various workaround for dealing with the various scripts of historical languages on systems that were never intended for anything but English. The Unicode Standard addresses many of the issues with character encoding across the world’s writing systems, including those used by historical languages, but its practical use in digital classical philology is not without challenges. This chapter will start with a conceptual overview of character coding systems and the Unicode Standard in particular but will discuss practical issues relating to the input, interchange, processing and display of classical texts. As well as providing guidelines for interoperability in text representation, various aspects of text processing at the character level will be covered including normalisation, search, regular expressions, collation, and alignment.

Abstract

CITE, originally developed for the Homer Multitext, is a digital library architecture for identification, retrieval, manipulation, and integration of data by means of machine-actionable canonical citation. CITE stands for “Collections, Indices, Texts, and Extensions”, and the acronym invokes the long history of citation as the basis for scholarly publication. Each of the four parts of CITE is based on abstract data models. Two parallel standards for citation identify data that implement those models: the CTS URN, for identifying texts and passages of text, and the CITE2 URN for identifying other data. Both of these URN citation schemes capture the necessary semantics of the data they identify, in context. In this paper we will describe the theoretical foundations of CITE, explain CTS and CITE2 URNs, describe the current state of the models for scholarly data that CITE defines, and introduce the current data formats, code libraries, utilities, and end-user applications that implement CITE.

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Abstract

The article aims to be an introduction to the dependency treebanks currently available for Ancient Greek and Latin, i.e., the Ancient Greek and Latin Dependency Treebank (AGLDT), the Index Thomisticus Treebank (IT-TB), the PROIEL Treebank, and the SEMATIA Treebank. Their pipelines for creation of morphosyntactic annotations are presented so as to highlight major commonalities and differences. All treebanks share the same basic underlying formalism, whereby syntactic words are connected to each other to form labeled directed acyclic graphs, and their annotation schemes, although different, are comparable to a very large extent.

Ancient Greek and Latin in the Digital Revolution

Abstract

The critical apparatus has been trade mark for classical philology ever since the development of the genealogical method and the establishment of the historical-critical edition. Its purpose is to justify the textus constitutus by displaying all significant variations in the history of a classical text and thus making editorial decisions transparent. Within digital scholarship, the critical apparatus tends to be perceived as a sign of methodological inadequacy and technological backwardness. Conceptual achievements of digital textual scholarship and their prototypical implementation into digital scholarly editions and library projects - even if mostly concerned with Medieval Latin, vernacular or modern literature - have developed a range of innovative practices, formats and features. These may help not only to transpose and vindicate the role of the critical apparatus in a digital environment but also to enhance its original core functionalities.

Abstract

The Digital Latin Library has a two-fold mission: 1) to publish and curate critical editions of Latin texts, of all types, from all eras; 2) to facilitate the finding and, where openly available and accessible online, the reading of all texts written in Latin. At first glance, it may appear that the two parts of the mission are actually two different missions, or even two different projects altogether. On the one hand, the DLL seeks to be a publisher of new critical editions, an endeavor that involves establishing guidelines, standards for peer review, workflows for production and distribution, and a variety of other tasks. On the other hand, the DLL seeks to catalog existing editions and to provide a tool for finding and reading them, an effort that involves the skills, techniques, and expertise of library and information science. But we speak of a “two-fold mission” because both parts serve the common goal of enriching and enhancing access to Latin texts, and they use the methods and practices of data science to accomplish that goal. This chapter will discuss how the DLL’s cataloging and publishing activities complement each other in the effort to build a comprehensive Linked Open Data resource for scholarly editions of Latin texts.

Abstract

The following paper gives a short description of the software-tool eComparatio that was originally intended as a tool for the comparison of different text editions. An example of its original purposes will be given, the larger part of the paper consists of a detailed description of the actual comparison process in detail. In a final section, some differences to similar text comparison tools for plain text will be given.