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The Creative Reuse of Disused Structures
Collaborative Strategies to Ensure Success

Abstract

As libraries continue to evolve, there is the opportunity to reimagine these places to meet the needs of contemporary and potential users. The library master plan provides a road map to answer the question: what is the library of the future? Through an integrated process that combines art (quantitative evidence) and science (qualitative aspects), architects and designers can work with library communities to re-envision spaces and programmes based on progressive pedagogy and opportunities for new interactions.

Abstract

This paper explores the genesis and building process of the Kooperative Speicherbibliothek Schweiz/Cooperative Storage Library Switzerland (CSLS) in Buron and outlines its operation during the first two years since inauguration, while also describing the institutions that govern the CSLS and the solutions found for the various governance and business challenges.

Abstract

In order to preserve printed collections, academic libraries need sufficient storage capacities and favourable storage conditions. This chapter will focus on one of the outstanding examples of such a storage library in Germany, the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek Speicherbibliothek/Bavarian Storage Facility Garching. The storage library in Garching was built to serve as an auxiliary stack building for the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek/Bavarian State Library. With an acquisition rate of up to 140,000 volumes per year, the Bavarian State Library was forced to move substantial portions of its holdings to off-site locations, away from the main library building in the Munich city centre. The chosen location was Garching, a northern suburb, where the storage library lies in close proximity to other research institutions and is part of one of the largest research campuses in Germany. Designed as an industrial building, the Garching buildings are a modular and extensible storage facility which features compact mobile shelving systems. The first building was finished in 1988, the second building in 2005, while a third building has been approved for funding and is expected to be finished in the early 2020s. The chapter describes the genesis and development of the Bavarian Storage Facility Garching, emphasising the necessity for long-term government funding.

Abstract

Librarians and library planners can work directly with communities to craft narratives that will describe their future libraries. The outcomes of this collaborative process become the criteria by which library building design options are evaluated. The process of developing the criteria and deriving designs builds community cohesion and community consensus behind library projects and ultimately creates better libraries. Outlined in this paper are basic organisational structures for interacting with communities via activities and tools that are digital and tangible, as well as graphical and narrative. The approach is illustrated with case studies describing the process and the completed buildings, or building designs for unbuilt projects, that have employed a range of community engagement techniques. Case studies include the 43,000 square foot (3995 square metres) newly constructed 2017 AIA/ALA award winning Varina Area Library in Henrico County, Virginia, as well as in-progress library projects: Seekonk Library, Seekonk Massachusetts; Forrer Learning Commons, Bridgewater College, Virginia; Wayland Free Public Library, Wayland, Massachusetts; and the Fairfield Area Library, Henrico County, Virginia. The following techniques were employed and evaluated: - Encouraging participation with online community surveys, employing preliminary feedback loops - Hosting hands‐on community drawing exercises illustrating “How I use the Library” as a basis for communicating and documenting the diversity of use patterns in current facilities - Telling “A Day in the Life” stories about future library activities and resources - Establishing future library facility goals on a space‐by‐space basis to supplement big picture aspirations, using community focus groups - Incorporating community evaluations of facility design solutions as they evolve - Graphically indicating how various elements of the community demographic will extract value from a future library based on use patterns anticipated and illustrated by individuals from the community Employing these processes, a community can write the story about its future library, assess the graphics to illustrate the story, and document understandings and anticipation of future use.

Abstract

The design of new or major renovations to library facilities requires considered involvement of stakeholders to ensure that the final designs reflect the diversity of users, changing needs and expectations. Two stakeholder engagement processes, one for the University of Saskatchewan Murray Library Master Plan working with the design team Group2 Architecture Interior Design Ltd. and Perkins+Will and a second for the Regina Public Library George Bothwell renovation and expansion project, are presented and reviewed. The relative success of the processes and considerations for improvement on future library projects, both academic and public, are outlined.

Abstract

A remarkable discussion about libraries was held by the Helsinki City Council politicians in January 2015. During this meeting a final decision was made to build the new Helsinki Central Library for 100M Euros (USD1.2M), with 75 votes for the project and only 8 votes against. High-quality speeches on the importance of libraries were given throughout the three-hour discussion, one after another. How was this possible? Has the fair wind continued? The key was, and continues to be, genuinely involving citizens in the project from the very beginning. The participation of citizens has resulted in booming and concrete public support for the project. Inside the library, it has demanded new thinking and the learning of new skills. Introducing participatory methods is a kind of revolution, if taken seriously. This paper analyses the new Helsinki Central Library project and addresses the impact of intense citizenship involvement over the years.

Abstract

This paper, originally presented as a six minute and forty second PechaKucha at the IFLA World Library Congress in Wroclaw, Poland, proposes some new and constructive ways of thinking about fundraising for academic libraries. The approach demands three elements. First, the fundraising model requires framing fundraising not as the sole responsibility of the development officer but as an integrated, team-based activity involving a broadly defined advancement team with strong engagement from the senior leadership group. Second, the model necessitates a deep organisational commitment to establishing a laser-sharp set of fundraising priorities, rather than scattering a thin layer of efforts across a broad spectrum of unfiltered ideas. Finally, the approach demands a willingness and ability to frame priorities, not as modest requests but as Big Ideas to capture the attention and the hearts of potential donors. This article presents a reasoned and disciplined course for academic libraries to follow in the attempt to increase the success of their fundraising endeavours.