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Hispanoamérica y España
Miradas hacia la Edad Media

Abstract

From a technological point of view, there are no limits to the amount of information an editor can add to a text. However, the encoding of the kind of multiple and miscellaneous data that is prone to be embedded in a digital edition might not be straightforward for inexperienced editors. Most beginners apply the most common method, that is, inline encoding. This technique entails the direct introduction of elements into the primary document which, together with their attributes, contain the structural and analytical information of the text. Such a method is perfectly adequate for simple ecdotic models. However, it becomes less efficient when we want to introduce multiple (and overlapping) layers of information. In this contribution, we present a stand-off annotation method which allows multi-layered and hierarchical annotation with the goal of designing a complex, flexible and processable critical apparatus.

Abstract

This paper discusses some of the challenges faced by an editor when encoding and interpreting the script of the Cancioneiro da Vaticana (V), the Galician-Portuguese songbook kept in the Vatican Library. It also proposes some solutions, embracing the idea that the goal here is to create an online resource that meets the informational needs of the scholarly community. The paper will focus on a single grapheme, y, in that this is a useful means of illustrating the difficulties provided by both the humanist minuscule and the particular copyist here when transcribing the text for computational processing in a database.

Abstract

The importance of King Alfonso X El Sabio (the Wise) in the history of the Castilian language underpins our interest in original evidence from the Royal Chancery. The collection and analysis of data from Alfonso X’s notarial texts has taken several years, and work is ongoing. During this time, we have adapted our activity to new IT developments and taken advantage of opportunities afforded by the Digital Humanities. In this work, we will show the progress and results of the project to date, describing the current state of our work and the future of our research here.

Abstract

All (or almost all) of us use digital tools in our scholarly activities. We use them to communicate, to write studies, to access documentary sources, and to perform analyses using a variety of tools... Digital libraries, thematic portals and databases have become essential tools, used as sources of information and in the dissemination of our findings. But is it enough?

Abstract

The emergence of new technologies in the heritage sector in recent years has opened the way for new relationships between the public and historical monuments and objects. Technologies that until recently were used for very specific needs, 3D scanning for example, are now used widely and allow museums and heritage managers to spread knowledge of their institutions and artefacts in unsuspected ways. Virtual reality is another of these advances, and allows completely immersive experiences, authentic journeys in time in which the viewer is surrounded by the past. Mappings, as in the case of #Taüll1123, involve stories being told in projected pictures, the magic thus seen to be running across the very walls of monuments. All these tools, combined with a narrative, and always following academic rigor in the preparation of the content, are examples of how far we can go in the dissemination of historical knowledge within the context of medieval heritage.

Abstract

This article explores a method of looking at both real and imaginary place name occurrences that co-occur in a corpus of medieval French courtly literature. It uses a dataset of normalized place name spellings and the names of works in which they are found, extracted automatically from a digitized canonical place name index, Louis-Fernand Flutre’s Table des noms propres avec toutes leurs variants figurant dans les romans du Moyen Âge écrits en français ou en provençal et actuellement publiés ou analysés (1962). Instead of visualizing this geographic information on a map, we visualize the data as a force-directed graph of places and works. The method offers a means of accounting for the recurrence of both real and imaginary names, the latter being unmappable on normative map interfaces. Important findings of this article’s analysis are threefold: many places that are difficult to geo-locate are also mentioned only once in Flutre’s corpus of 221 works; subgenres of romance have a kind of spatial imprint, that is, many of the same places are shared between them; and at the center of the network of shared places in medieval French romances sit a number of highly weighted, that is, quite recurrent Mediterranean and central European places.

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Abstract

HILAME (Hidalgos, Labradoras, Mercaderes) is a research project based on the treatment and visualization of prosopographic data. Centered on the Cantabrian territories in the Late Middle Ages, it has emerged as a result of the collaborative work of historians, computer developers and designers. Focused primarily on the user, the project aims to grow and develop through investigating the possibility that its interfaces, especially those regarding network visualization, can become research tools.