SEARCH CONTENT

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,621 items :

  • History of Literary Studies x
Clear All Modify Search
Investigating Aesthetic Practices from Early Modernity to the Digital Age

Abstract

A few of the many rubrics in Codex Amiatinus include colophonic phrases. This article investigates their nature (generally formulaic and conventional) and the various factors that may lie behind their inclusion, highlighting the possible contribution of individual scribes. Their implications for Wearmouth- Jarrow’s scribal culture are considered

FREE ACCESS

Abstract

Cryptic writing in the Middle Ages tends to take the form of single words or brief phrases, but single sentences, which fit the definition of microtexts, occasionally occur. Much has been written on cryptic writing generally, but relatively little on such writing in English up to 1100, presumably because the survival of examples is so rare. This essay begins with a brief summary of cryptic writing generally and applies it to all known examples of it in early English. It brings together information about such writing as exists in the tenth and eleventh centuries and about the scribes involved in transmitting it to us

Abstract

In an attempt to analyse the text of Cædmon’s Hymn (CædH) without immediately having recourse to the Latin in Bede’s Historia ecclesiastica gentis anglorum, the originality of the Anglo-Saxon poem emerges. It is consequently rather unlikely that CædH should represent a back-translation based on Bede’s Latin version. On the contrary, it can be assumed that Bede’s intent may have been to gloss over details in the Old English text that seemed to him theologically controversial and/or dogmatically doubtful. Particularly striking are the differences in the second part of the Hymn. These are dealt with first (Sections 4 and 5). In the first part of the Hymn, Latin potentiam corresponds to a plural form in the Old English text (Section 6). The grammatical analysis of line 1a is ambiguous (Section 7)

Abstract

Encyclopaedic notes occur in some 45 manuscripts from Helmut Gneuss and Michael Lapidge’s Bibliographical Handlist (2014), either as individual microtexts or in groups. They are either single statements conveying factual information, or lists itemising simple knowledge. The manuscript context of encyclopaedic notes is, as yet, unexplored: they may occur in the periphery, in the margins or centrally in manuscripts, but are never part of the larger texts in these codices. In this article, I review a group of encyclopaedic notes which recurs, in various forms, in six manuscripts. By considering codicological as well as textual features and by assessing the interplay between the intentions of authors or compilers vis-à-vis reader- or user-response, it becomes clear that the insertion of encyclopaedic notes was motivated by various types of associations made by scribes and compilers. These associations are the key to establishing their communicative functions

FREE ACCESS
FREE ACCESS