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Ritual Lamenting in Ancient Mesopotamia
Notions of Kingship in Visual and Textual Narration in the Ancient Near East

Abstract

In 2001–2002, the Iraqi State Board of Antiquities and Heritage undertook excavations at the site of Shmet in the Umma region, thereby uncovering a large residential quarter. This article presents the first six cuneiform tablets from the first excavation season at the site, dating to the Presargonic and Ur III periods. The god names mentioned support the identification of Shmet with the ancient city of Ki.an ki.

Abstract

This article presents the earliest documented association between the healing goddess, dogs and physicians in Mesopotamia. This is achieved through mining all relevant administrative texts from the livestock archive at Puzriš-Dagan (modern Drehem) dated to the Ur III period and corroborating the information gathered with the few pertinent iconographic and archaeological attestations.

Abstract

The Assyrian subordinative morphemes -u/-ni are treated as allomorphs with the same distribution and function. In this paper we will examine the syntax of these morphemes in Assyrian and argue that they are in fact two distinct morphemes with no allomorphic relation. We will further follow a number of significant syntactic developments in the use of the subordinative morphemes in Neo-Assyrian.

Abstract

Houses with central courtyards, examples of which were uncovered at Tell Arbid, show that standardization in house plans and spatial organization characteristic for EJZ 3 domestic architecture, can be traced back to the late Ninevite 5 period. Houses of this type were built at plots of lands and had a regular internal layout. Also in terms of socio-economic organization houses with central courtyards of late Ninevite 5 date can be regarded as a reference to the EJZ 3 period.

Abstract

This study analyses a literary topos concerning the abundance of natural phenomena, including fresh water, reed beds and fish. The standardised sequence listing such abundant natural features occurs in two previously unpublished tablets containing Emesal prayers concerning the god Enki, published in this article. The Old Babylonian tablet, of unknown provenance, attests to a unique composition. The tablet from Late Babylonian Ur, which is partially paralleled by a previously known manuscript, includes performative indications.

Abstract

A new duplicate of the hymn dubbed ‹Ishtar-Louvre› is published here. It supplies part of the lost end of the text, and prompts new interpretations of some previously known passages (uzunšu liškun mummāšipu i 2 and 4; in the play of the loom, Ishtar determines the sex of the baby i 45 sq.) as well as lexical remarks on tūqaru/tūgaru, sissiru.