SEARCH CONTENT

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,442 items :

  • Dialectology x
Clear All
Zur diskursiven Konstruktion des Andalusischen
FREE ACCESS

Abstract

Grattachecca is the name of a typical Roman sweet made of grated ice. Although the word is commonly believed to be of local origin, the diffusion of the word grattamarianna (grattamariano), designating the same icy treat in several regions of Italy (Puglia, Northern Marche, Tuscany, Southern Lazio), points to a borrowing into romanesco from other Italian dialects. Once in Rome, the second part of the compound would have been replaced with Checca, a common female nickname in the capital. As far as the etymology of grattamarianna is concerned, the Lombard word gratamarna ‘dough scraper’ (hence metonymically ‘ice grater’ and ‘grated ice’) might be a plausible starting point, although it is not clear how the word has reached Central and Southern Italy.

Abstract

This study reconstructs the development, in nineteenth- and twentiethcentury Romanesco, of ammazza!, from ‘kill.IMP.2SG’ to an interjection expressing surprise. The mirative value, initially only attested when the imperative form was followed by a 3rd or 2nd person clitic (ammazzela! ‘kill her!’, ammazzelo! ‘kill him!’, ammazzete! ‘kill yourself!’, etc.), was then extended also to a form without clitics. From the semantic point of view, while the first attestations express disapproval (conjoined with surprise), soon the form started to be used to express admiration. This development, which is documented also for the euphemistic variant ammappa!, and which was borrowed from Romanesco by colloquial Italian, is analyzed as a possible instance of grammaticalization, yielding a form which expresses semantic values typical of the category of mirativity.

Abstract

The paper comments on slang words and expressions that recur in the Cronica of the so-called Anonimo romano, one of the greatest Italian writers of the fourteenth century, who chose the dialect of Rome to compose his work. This material is then studied from a stylistic point of view and interpreted as a manifestation of the two dominant stylistic features of the Cronica: verbal condensation and rhythm.

Abstract

This paper deals with the neologisms included in the letter A of the Vocabolario Romanesco contemporaneo (Lexicon of contemporary Roman dialect), which is presently work in progress.

Abstract

This research aims to detect, in Italian writings from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, some words and phrases that the authors claim to be Roman. The whole documentation is composed of hundreds of examples and it should contribute to the knowledge of the Roman dialect. However, each example needs close investigation to make sure of its actual Roman origin. This essay, which is only the preliminary stage of an ongoing research, presents some interesting texts for such research and provides a provisional glossary (composed of 33 entries).

Abstract

In this paper, I discuss a set of lexical items which are peculiar to (Old) Eastern Tuscan, at odds with Florentine and standard literary Italian. Some of them, such as incigliare ‘to scutch’, òppio ‘poplar’, póccia ‘breast’, are also common in most dialects of the Area (peri)mediana. Among the words which are widespread throughout Central Italy, it is possible to find a small group that Arezzo shares with the dialect of Rome, such as catòrcio ‘bolt’, déto ‘finger’, lograre ‘to wear out’, ‘to consume’ and Old Aretine mannarino ‘hog’ or ‘suckling pig’ (Modern Romanesco ‘old ox’ or ‘mutton’).

Abstract

The Judeo-Romanesco glossary by Judah Romano, alongside entries from southern Italy or Gallo-Romance, presents a portion of vocabulary undoubtedly pertinent to the Jewish variety of medieval Rome. The document, therefore, like the other ancient Judeo-Romanesco glossaries, seems apt to document in early Romanesco lexical entries otherwise known for the subsequent periods of the city’s dialect.