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Volume 2
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Abstract

This paper examines the reciprocal relationship between the representation of land­scape in Japan and the development of modern Japanese tourism. Starting from the development of modern domestic tourism in the Meiji period, the idea of the “modern” landscape in Japan was, and still is today, closely linked to the concept of Japanese nature and the formation of a national identity. The following gives an overview of how the concept of landscape is connoted in tourism research and addresses how the image of the authentic rural area and its scenery is repeatedly (re-)produced in advertising materials of the Japanese tourism industry. It further discusses to what extent modern tourism in Japan has contributed to popularizing a new “view” on landscapes and how it helped with “inscribing Japaneseness” in rural landscapes over the course of time.

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Diskurse um Regionalität, Natur und Nation

Abstract

Tonari no Totoro is considered a genuinely Japanese anime movie, not only be­cause of its shōjo aesthetics and its nostalgia for the countryside lifestyle of the early post-war period, but also for its references to spirituality and environmentalism, which are nowadays interpreted in the context of satoyama. This concept combines academic studies on environmental conservation with a national ideology of “the Japanese” living in harmony with nature since ancient times. Ironically, Tonari no Totoro offers no clear references to environmentalism. The connection between the movie and satoyama was retrospectively established in the 2000s as a result of its eco-nostalgic depiction of a perfect rural past, which I call an “absolute satoyama.” The vision of this “absolute satoyama” even became the driving force of a forest conservation NPO in the suburbs of Greater Tōkyō. This NPO’s activities and recent fame subsequently reinforced the interpretation of Tonari no Totoro as an environ­mental movie reflecting on Japanese traditions of satoyama.

Abstract

This paper studies the present-day literary production in the prefecture of Iwate. A look back to the dawn of the 20th century shows that some similarities are still in place: self-publishing, regional and prefectural awards for local literature and pub­lishing through local newspapers. Also, the local outlets still seem to have mostly a local audience in mind. However, in the last years some authors from and in Iwate have managed not only to make a living from their profession, but also to reach the national market and win the most prestigious literary prizes. This paper points out the main actors and institutions in Iwate’s literary scene and sheds light on the con­ditions that facilitated certain changes. Thus, this case study adds to the efforts of de­lineating ‘peripheral’ cultural production and bringing it to the centre of attention.