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improve the service substantially. In addition, the settlement aimed to avoid the threat of the great copyright meltdown outlined above. Clearly both sides saw real risks in forcing a court- room showdown. However, back when Google introduced the library- scanning project as part of the Books program, many copyright critics celebrated the fact that a big, rich, powerful company was taking a stand to strengthen fair use. That never happened. Fair use in the digital world is just as murky and unpredictable as it was the day before the settlement. But what of the

service substantially. In addition, the settlement aimed to avoid the threat of the great copyright meltdown outlined above. Clearly both sides saw real risks in forcing a courtroom showdown. However, back when Google introduced the library-scan- ning project as part of the Books program, many copyright critics cel- ebrated the fact that a big, rich, powerful company was taking a stand to strengthen fair use. That never happened. Fair use in the digital world is just as murky and unpredictable as it was the day before the settlement. But what about the problems

trends within the Hindi lan- guage. “They have a love for literature, “ he added, “but today there are more ways of looking at the world. Film and TV now constitute language.”12 What this means for Ravikant and others who work in the Hindi lab of Sarai is that the “authority” over the Hindi language no lon- ger comes exclusively from the literary elite. It is becoming both more anonymous and more collaborative, as befits the technologies associ- ated with the digital world. Yet the nature of this collaboration was also new, since when one works online one may not

1 Nineteen ninety-fi ve was the inaugural year of the twenty-fi rst century, a clear starting point for contemporary life. It was “the year of the Internet,” when the World Wide Web entered mainstream consciousness, when now-familiar mainstays of the digital world such as Amazon.com, eBay, Craigslist, and Match.com estab- lished their presence online. It was, proclaimed an exuberant newspaper columnist at the time, “the year the Web started changing lives.”1 Nineteen ninety-fi ve was marked by a deepening national preoccupa- tion with terrorism. The massive

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Valley—an éminence grise who shaves his head. He is respected more than ever. Wired magazine said in 2012 that no one in the preceding twenty years had “done more than Marc Andreessen to change the way we communicate.”34 Andreessen these days heads a venture capital fi rm, Andreessen- Horowitz, that has backed such winners as Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Groupon, and Pinterest. Andreessen also is much sought-after for his predictions and assessments, which tend to be sweeping and colorful. He still marvels at the still-unfolding digital world. In a commentary in

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other entertainment 82 / Studios online that consumers can view in lieu of our motion pictures? There may be all kinds of reasons that the number of discs being sold in North Amer- ica has declined over the last few years. What I do know is that there’s a large number of consumers who love collecting our movies, and we’ve made it really easy in the physical world and really challenging, at best, in the digital world. My focus is: I don’t want to lose a consumer from collecting our movies because we haven’t given the consumer the kind of experience they want

of the scientific or technical challenges a start-up promises to surmount. Investors are often impressed by the credentials of a company’s core founding team, and less than careful when it comes to the science in question. The digital world has shaped this way of thinking, Parthasarathy says. Many investors built their fortunes through software companies, and their expectations for companies are based on the temporality of programming within the controlled environment of the com- puter. If you put a group of smart young software engineers (well, they don

canvas now simultaneously exists as no place and anyplace. In virtual reality, the canvas is at once Walter Benjamin’s “playspace” and Nam June Paik’s “without gravity” art of the future.29 Similarly, photography’s “writing with light” is literalized within a virtual arena absent any camera. These cameraless images are rooted in the physical gesture of the artist’s hand in real time and real space. The handmade mark endures, imbuing the digital world with a touch—as László Moholy-Nagy demonstrated nearly a century ago with his photograms—that somehow is and isn

 phone uses your loca- tion to connect you with rideshare drivers and a digital map plots the  route to your destination. Want a preview of the place you are going?  You  have  a  lot  of  options—digital  maps,  satellite  and  street  view  images, and 3-D models of buildings and the landscape around them.  This blending of the real world and the digitalworld will only con- tinue as augmented and virtual reality become more common. H i s t o r i c a l c u r i o s i t y [ 5 ] Tech companies like Google make a lot of money from geospa- tial technologies. But the

most of them had heard about the Internet, in part because of newspaper articles that offered introductions to the emergent digital world. 24 | The Year of the Internet twenty-eight years old; he became a billionaire three years later when eBay went public.14 The online dating service Match.com got its start in 1995, and cyber- dating gained recognition as “more than just a passing whim.”15 The New York Times made its fi rst, top-dipping forays into the digital land- scape in October 1995, posting reports at http://www.nytimes.com /pope about the visit to the

in 1995