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to accom- modate goats, ponies, and (unintentionally) barn owls. In 1990, Tunnell ripped out 16 acres of walnut and hazelnut trees and planted 10.5 acres of pinot noir. The brick house gave its name to the vineyard. In 1993, realizing that plain grape growing was not financially viable, he converted the barn into a low-tech winery (carefully retaining its farm barn ambience, however, down to bales of hay used for seating) and engaged Steve Doerner of Cristom Vineyards to custom-crush the first vintage of Brick House pinot. Gradually Tunnell himself learned to make

-south-oriented rows on a gentle south- facing slope, commanding an impressive view of San Pablo Bay. The top of the property is so heavily strewn with rock that Moravec describes grape growing in this section as “nearly hydroponic”; the bottom of the vine- yard is Haire clay-loam. Now perfectly mani- cured and tidily cover-cropped, with each row’s end post color-coded by clone, the vine- yard bears little witness to the exhausted pas- tureland, rat-infested barns, and derelict cars that greeted Moravec and Reaume when they purchased the land in 1984. To undo the decades of damage

heavily strewn with rock that Moravec describes grape growing in this section as “nearly hydroponic”; the bottom of the vine- yard is Haire clay-loam. Now perfectly mani- cured and tidily cover-cropped, with each row’s end post color-coded by clone, the vine- yard bears little witness to the exhausted pas- tureland, rat-infested barns, and derelict cars that greeted Moravec and Reaume when they purchased the land in 1984. To undo the decades of damage, Moravec farms sustain- ably, preferring, for example, to lose a few grapes than to poison birds. “We steward this land

Greenwood Road in 1971—for weekend re- treats. Allan Green spent enough time on the ranch to play softball with some of Anderson Valley’s wine pioneers and to become infected with the idea that grape growing could be, well, cool. When Tony and Gretchen Husch decided to sell the warm-weather vineyard parcel they owned adjacent to the Greens’ property, the Greens acquired three acres of cabernet and two and a half acres each of merlot and riesling. Jed Steele, a softball chum, talked Green through his first years as a home winemaker. Greenwood Ridge was bonded in 1980

wine writer Robert Finigan, the youngest Torres under- took to persuade her father that the family should expand its business beyond Spain and Chile to include grape growing and winemak- ing in California. At the time Marimar was not especially passionate about pinot noir, and the family’s experience elsewhere was concentrated in warm-climate varieties; but the purchase in 1983 of a 56-acre parcel west of Graton, just ten miles as the crow flies from the Pacific Coast, argued for a wine program focused on pinot and chardonnay. About the same time, Torres began work

3 4 5 Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties C o a s t a l W i n e m a k i n g w i t h a T w i s t The wines being produced in these counties are very much influenced by the placement of their vineyards that are near the Pacific Ocean. Even with the recent emergence of grape growing in areas back from the coast in the Santa Barbara County enclaves of Happy Canyon and the Cuyama Valley, it is grapes like Pinot Noir and Chardonnay that are the prime focus of the wineries here. Syrah is making strong inroads because of that grape’s ability to grow in cool

states. The result is a minefield of complex rules and exceptions that comprise nine volumes and more than fifty thou- sand pages in the Liquor Control Law Reporter.1 I learned the details of wine law by handling cases covering every aspect of the wine business from grape growing to wine production, including dis- tribution, sales, pricing, marketing, advertising, labeling, taxation, and li- censing in the fifty states. I found that the only way to explain the arcane wine laws to my clients was to recount American history—our zeal for tem- perance; the early allure of

only expensive to buy but costly to develop and cultivate. It is difficult to make grape growing pay. Not surprisingly, then, even though the federally defined Santa Cruz Mountains Viticultural Area is extensive, spreading beyond the county to include the east flank of the mountains in Santa Clara, where barriers are less political than they are economic, and north along the ridge to embrace the high ground of San Mateo, fewer than three hundred of its acres are planted with vines presently bearing grapes. Of those, Santa Cruz County itself has thirty

Guardian, February 8, 2003. Hoag, Dana. Agricultural Crisis in America. Denver: ABC-CLIO, 1999. Howes, David. Sensual Relations: Engaging the Senses in Culture and Social Theory. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003. BIBLIOGRAPHY 284 Hufton, Olwen. “Social Conflict and the Grain Supply in Eighteenth-Century France.” In Hunger and History, edited by Robert Rothberg and Theodore Rabb. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. Husmann, George. American Grape Growing and Wine Making. New York: Orange Judd Co., 1880. Hutchinson, John. “Northern California from

Vineyard Other Vineyards VDP Erste Lage Landmarks Bold Nonbold LEGEND Subregion border cont. p. 62 CLIMATE The Ruwer subregion is located— like the Mosel— at the northern limit of grape growing. However, its location as the westernmost German wine region also means that it is influenced by a maritime climate and enjoys relatively mild winters and warm summers. In Trier, the average annual temperature is 9.9 degrees C. As part of the Rhine- land massif, the Ruwer valley is protected from cold north- erly and easterly winds by the Eifel and Hunsrück ranges. On the sun