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, 122n, 139n Guiraud, P., 43n, 48n, 108n Gutman, D.D., 28, 171n Gyphtokastro, 89n, 98-99 Halstead, P., 219-20 Hammond, G.L.L., 89n, 99n, 133nn Hannibal, 184n, 250 Hanson, D.D., xi; "Hoplites into Dem- ocrats," 206; The Other Greeks: The Agrarian Roots ofWestern Civilization, xiv,204,206,211,213,215,218, 230,243,250; "Practical Aspects of Grape-Growing and the Ideology of Greek Viticulture," 224; "Thucydides and the Desertion of Attic Slaves during the Decelean War," 211, 237, 238; The Western Way ofWar, 203 Harding, P., 228, 236 Hardy, G.G., 20n, 59n, 63n, 70n, 134n

Agriculture: An Introduction (London, 1992), 26-33; A. B. Burford, Land and Labor in Ancient Greece (Baltimore, 1993), 100-166; and in general for grain, olives, and other fruit trees and cereals, pp. 2 I -43. On vine pruning and trellising, see V. D. Hanson, "Practical Aspects of Grape-Growing and the Ideology of Greek Viticulture," in Agriculture in Ancient Greece, ed. Wells, 161-166. Vines can be pulled out rather easily by a modern vineyard tractor, and even more effortlessly rooted out-as is now the normal commer- cial practice in California-with a moderate