Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items :

  • "grape growing" x
  • Anglo-American Literature, general x
Clear All

German pride in the fa- therland, John Paul Dreiser spoke of his native village’s loveliness—“how the hills rose about it, how grape-growing was its principal industry, how there were castles there and grafs [counts] and rich burghers, and how there was a wall about the city which in his day constituted it an armed fortress, h o o s i e r h a r d t i m e s4 Loving, The Last Titan 9/30/04 8:00 AM Page 4 and how often as a little child [his father] had been taken out through some one of its great gates seated on the saddle of some kindly minded cavalry- man and

want you to send me immediately all necessary memoranda to enable Camp to understand the condition, quantity & resources of the land, & how he must go about finding it. lie will visit St Louis & talk with the folks, & then go at once & see the land, & telegraph me whether he closes with my proposition or not. Clemens later recalled that Camp "agreed to buy our Tennessee land for two hundred thousand dollars His scheme was to import foreigners from grape-growing and wine-making districts in Europe, settle them on the land, and turn it into a wine-growing country." But

after the father's death in 1847 responsibility for realizing income from the land fell chiefly to Orion, every member of the Clemens family, at one time or another, cherished schemes for exploiting it" (Ll, 79 n. 11). Clemens's own efforts to sell EXPLANATORY NOTES 645 the land in 1865-66 to grape-growing interests were frustrated by Ori- on's inconvenient temperance beliefs. In about 1887 Orion traded away what the family believed to be the last of the Tennessee land-a ten- thousand-acre parcel-but in 1906, Clemens was surprised by a pro- posal that he sell a

that. Later, Mr. Camp gave me another chance. He agreed to buy our Tennessee land for two hundred thousand dollars, pay a part of the amount in cash and give long notes for the rest. His scheme was to import foreigners from grape-growing and wine-making districts in Europe, settle them on the land, and turn it into a wine-growing country. He knew what Mr. Longworth thought of those Tennessee grapes, and was satisfied. i sent the contracts and things to orion for his signature, he being one of the three heirs. But they arrived at a bad time— in a doubly bad time