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From Prohibition to the Present

: Capra Press, 1979. The standard work on one of the most colorful and influential figures in California wine history. Includes a reprint in full of Haraszthy’s 1862 classic, “Grape Culture, Wines, and Wine-Making.” Schoonmaker, Frank, and Tom Marvel. American Wines. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1941. Schoonmaker was a path-blazing visionary who pushed for wine quality and truth in labeling in the years following the repeal of Prohibition. Shabram, Patrick L. Petition to Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms for Establishment of an American Viticultural Area to

: Capra Press, 1979. The standard work on one of the most colorful and influential figures in California wine history. Includes a reprint in full of Haraszthy’s 1862 classic, “Grape Culture, Wines, and Wine-Making.” Schoonmaker, Frank, and Tom Marvel. American Wines. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1941. Schoonmaker was a path-blazing visionary who pushed for wine quality and truth in labeling in the years following the repeal of Prohibition. Shabram, Patrick L. Petition to Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms for Establishment of an American Viticultural Area to

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years after the repeal of Prohibition. An important part of the modern story comes from the fact that, unlike all the other world-class varieties that have become a part of California’s pre- mium wine production, Zinfandel has no model of European perfection for comparison. When we sit down at a blind tasting to evaluate and compare a few red Bordeaux and California Cabernets, we can have a good time think- ing and talking about what we perceive. Which do we like better? Which will be better in years to come? Have the California producers used the grand cru wine of

Introduction: Napa an J the Notion of Wine Quality Americans' notion of quality wine — indeed, their very idea of what "wine" was or should be — changed dramatically during the five decades that separated Repeal of Prohibition in 1933 from the introduction of geographic appellations of origin in the 1980s. Put starkly, the public's expectation of "wine" shifted from a fortified, often oxidized or spoiled beverage, produced from indistinct grape va- rieties, to a table wine possessing distinct flavor attributes derived from varietal grapes and from

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slow and was com- plicated first by the Great Depression and then by the Second World War. From the 1960s on, however, wine growing in America has expanded remark- ably and has generated an interest among the American people such as it never had before. By all measures, American wine is flourishing: there are now more acres of vines planted, more wineries in more states, and more wine produced than the most optimistic booster could have imagined possible in the generation following the repeal of Prohibition.2 In this book I have attempted a version of this story

are the outcome of the interaction of demand by special-interest groups and supply from legis- lators, both of whom are rational and act in their own self-interest. As a result, government regulation may enhance the welfare of particular groups at the expense of wine consumers, and possibly reduce socioeco- nomic welfare. While the original intent of government regulation of the wine industry following the repeal of Prohibition may have been to enhance social welfare, there is little evidence that states have been pur- suing the public interest in instituting

sell wine freely from his vineyard in Napa Valley after the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. Fourteen years of restriction had reduced the wine industry to tatters. If there had once been a classic California wine of determined style and quality for Georges de Latour to protect and promote, the Volstead Act would have swept it away. On the other hand, consumers denied access to wine by Prohibition (which began in many beaulieu vineyard’s georges de latour private reserve 148 / Beaulieu Vineyard’s Georges de Latour Private Reserve states earlier than 1919) and

-to-do couple—perhaps with a chauffeur at the wheel—is enjoying a beverage on the road. On the right, a working man is opening his lunch kit. The fac- tory owner is on one side, and the morning-shift man on the other. Figure 87 is a pocket-size four-page brochure f fixtures, beer coolers, and similar equipment sold by the Dry Dock Fixture Company of New York during the 1930s. In chapter 10, I discuss how nudity became the byword in certain kinds of menu graphics following the repeal of Prohibition, and this little handout also doc- uments the larger shift in sexual

, they amounted to only about 2 percent of Califor- nia’s wine grape acreage in 1919. (And this percentage changed very little af- ter the repeal of Prohibition. A large market for fine California wine did not exist until the 1960s.) The prejudice against Zinfandel was short-lived, as far as shipping was concerned. It didn’t take long for a sizeable number of eastern connoisseurs— though by no means a majority—to discover that Zinfandel packed a highly recognizable varietal flavor. And, unlike Carignane and Mourvèdre, it didn’t prohibition and the fresh grape deal