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chapter 3 The Church of All Nations and the Quest for “Indigenous Immigrant Communities” a source of “indigenous community action” Sometime in 1927 G. Bromley Oxnam, the founder and first pastor of the Church of All Nations, granted an interview to a student research- ing the institution. In many ways Oxnam’s creation resembled the dozens of other missions, settlement homes, and Americanization pro- grams that dotted the central neighborhoods of early-twentieth-century Los Angeles. Oxnam had founded All Nations under the auspices of the Methodist church in 1918

Multiethnic Neighborhoods in Early Twentieth-Century Los Angeles
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Contents List of Illustrations and Tables vii Acknowledgments ix Introduction 1 1. The Familiarity of “Foreign Quarters”: The Central Los Angeles Populace 9 2. Building the White Spot of America: The Corporate Reconstruction of Ethnoracial Los Angeles 38 3. The Church of All Nations and the Quest for “Indigenous Immigrant Communities” 62 4. “So Many Children at Once and So Many Kinds”: The World of Central City Children 94 5. Mixed Couples: Love, Sex, and Marriage across Ethnoracial Lines 121 6. Preaching to Mixed Crowds: Ethnoracial Coalitions and the