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British Working-Class Education in the Nineteenth Century

Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History published. 1842 While visiting the Bury St. Edmunds area, he conceives the idea for Past and Present. 1843 Past and Present published. 1844 John Sterling dies. 1845 Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches published. 1847 Emerson visits England and spends time with the Carlyles. 1848 Carlyle meets Sir Robert Peel, whom he admires and whose leading role in the repeal of the Corn Laws he has supported. 1849 Carlyle tours Ireland with his friend Gavan Duffy and finds English policies substantially responsible for the

the Heroic in History published. While visiting the Bury St. Edmunds area, he conceives the idea for Past and Present. Past and Present published. John Sterling dies. Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches published. Emerson visits England and spends time with the Carlyles. Carlyle meets Sir Robert Peel, whom he admires and whose leading role in the repeal of the Corn Laws he has supported. Carlyle tours Ireland with his friend Gavan Duffy and finds English policies substantially responsible for the condition of Ireland. Writes his Reminiscences of My Irish Journey

California Press, 1995), 42–43. 30. See Douglas Hay, Peter Linebaugh, J. Rule, E. P. Thompson, and C. Winslow, Albion’s Fatal Tree: Crime and Society in Eighteenth-Century England (New York: Pantheon, 1975), 17–63; Clive Emsley, Crime and Soci- ety in England, 1750–1900 (New York: Longman, 1996), 1–16; David Taylor, Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1750–1914 (New York: St. Mar- tin’s Press, 1998), 1–6. 31. This pattern was especially evident during Robert Peel’s effort to modify the laws regulating sex between men (see chapter 3). 32. In a 1974 article, A. D

reforms by state action? Not at all, in reality. For we must take into account the question of the “decline of values,” which conservatives have seen as one of the central consequences of modernity. To reverse the perceived current decadence of society, to restore society to the purer state in which it existed before, they have always needed the state. It has been said of one of the great English conservatives of the 1840s, Sir Robert Peel, that “he believed that a constitution issuing in a strong executive was essential to the anarchic age in which he lived

Books and Instruc tions. MEPO 8/1, Metropolitan Police. Instructions, Orders, &c. &c. Old Bailey Session Papers: PCOM 1/21, 1825, case no. 68, 291–94. Parliamentary Papers: Command Papers, Criminal Offender and Judicial Sta- tistics, Annual Returns. Statistics gathered from 1805 to 1880. Select Bibliography 249 Papers of Sir Robert Peel: General Correspondence, British Library Manuscript Collection. MS 40, 400. Privy Council Papers. PC 1/3953, 1811. Session Papers: Old Bailey Proceedings, PCOM 1. Surveyed 1800–34. Session Papers: Old Bailey Proceedings, PCOM 1

still undecided for whom to vote in late October might have been swayed by the able and astringent Croly. W i t h "all the tortured integrity that gave his leadership its peculiar strength," he waited until the next to last issue before the election to declare that the Republican party consisted of a fortuitous collection of warring factions united only by an intolerance of Wilson. "Tory ism under Sir Robert Peel," he quipped, "was once described as organized hypocrisy; Republicanism under Charles Evans Hughes may be described as organized in- compatibility

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. (London, 1858-65) - were very useful for land x defences in the same period. For the long period of crisis in Anglo- American relations from the mid 1830s to the late 1860s there is a rich harvest in the many available collections of leading cabinet ministers. The collections which have proved of most value to me are those of the third Viscount Palmerston (in the British Museum and in those formerly at Broadlands, Romsey, Hampshire, and now temporarily with the National Register of Archives in London); Sir Robert Peel, the fourth earl of Aberdeen, and W. E

the hostilities that were to make the name of Sir Charles Napier a household word and to lead to the erection of his statue next to that of Nelson in Trafalgar Square. As British officers in India were largely unhampered by administrative restraints, the attitude they maintained toward the native peoples is of some importance. Most British officers did not consider the Indians their peers nor, as Sir Robert Peel stated in Parliament, did they feel that the rules which governed the intercourse between civilized nations applied to barbarians.8 Thus, any

Babbage, Additional Manuscripts 37205, 37192, 37200. Robert Peel, Additional Manuscripts 40515. Calcutta High Court Archives Plea Side. Civil Side. Cambridge University Library Jardine Matheson Archives. Guildhall Library, London Assam (Tea) Company Papers, 9924-9936. Walter Prideaux Papers, 8794-8803. India Office Library and Record Room, London Records: Home Miscellaneous 839-853, Broughton Papers; Home Depart- 258 BIBLIOGRAPHY ment, Railways, 4 PWD/3, nos. 19-25; Despatches to India and Bengal; Revenue Letters Received from Bengal and India, Board