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CONTENTS Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Very Short History of the Imagination 1 9 Introduction ............ 9 Myth, Memory, and Emotion . . . 10 Ancient and Medieval Imagination 12 Imagination in the Enlightenment. 18 The Romantic Imagination .... 22 Imagination in the Modem Period: Philosophical Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 26 Imagination in the Modem Period: Psychological Work . . . . . . . 33 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 II Why Is Imagination Important to

- ther from each other, or from museums. The library in the modern sense meant the differentiation and articula- tion of a space for books and their simulacra, such as catalogues and other virtual registers. This was a feat of the Enlightenment and Romantic era. The transformation in the collection of books went hand in hand with a transformation of the interrelation of books, that is, the system of knowl- edge. The emergence of the modern research library is correlative with the transformation of the pursuit of academic knowledge from erudition to re- search. The

6 passim, 154·156 Einstein, Albert, 62 Eisner, Elliot W., 10 1, 150, 170n Emotion, 4,9·12,51,52,55,158. See also Affect Empirical research, 68, 69, 88, 167 Engell, James, 20, 170n Enlightenment, The, 18·22 Entertainment, 162, 163 Eratosthenes, 117, 121.124 Evaluation, 100.102,124,125, 132, 133, 143, 144, 14~ 150 Extremes of human experience, 72·75,86 Extremes of reality, 72·75, 109, 110 FACTORIES, as influence on schools, 153, 154 Fancy, 19,23 Fiction, 54·56 Finn, Charles E. Jr., 53, 173n Framework for planning, 94 Freedom, 57·59 Freud

university overall: the deep faith in transcendent reason. Can this spirit of reason be the founda- tion for morality? Can science found a moral course of study for the university? There are deep philosophical reasons to be 174 CHAPTER TEN suspicious of the Enlightenment program for morality-and thus the place of moral learning in the Enlightenment’s child: the research university. What interests me here is not the philo- sophical intricacies-though I will indulge in some-but the present challenge to the Enlightenment ideal presented by the heated multicultural

: University of Chicago Press. Hofstadter, Richard, and Walter Metzger. 1955. The Development of Academic Freedom in the United States. New York: Columbia University Press. Horwitz, Paul. 2007. “Universities as First Amendment Institutions.” UCLA Law Review 54. Kant, Immanuel. 1784. “What Is Enlightenment?” In The Art of Theory, Conversations in Political Philosophy. www.artoftheory .com/what- is- enlightenment_immanuel- kant/. ———. 1798. The Conflict of Faculties, trans. and intro. Mary J. Gregor. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992. Karran, Terrence. 2009

research uni- versity engaged in its own protest against the Protestant colle- giate establishment of its day. The university protest was undertaken in the name of science, reason, and universal truth as against particular (biblical) revelation. The research univer- sity ideology (highly simplified) captured two anti-authoritar- ian strands: the eighteenth-century Enlightenment view of reason over history and the nineteenth-century Romantic view of heros over history. To the thinkers of the Enlightenment, rea- son was universal, accessible by pure thought alone

, 36, 49, 62, 86, 98, 170, 172, 192, 194 Discipline Based Art Education, 224 Dow, Arthur Wesley, 209, 216 drawing, 14, 30, 32, 42, 93, 96, 109, 146, 153, 165, 180–181, 187–188, 200, 208, 215, 217, 221 Duveneck, Frank, 219 E Eakins, Thomas, 219 Ellison, Ralph, 218 engagement, 90, 92, 138, 140, 166, 226 Enlightenment, 207 ethnicity, 16, 22 evaluation, xx, 8, 25, 82, 125–126, 134, 136–137, 141–142, 144–145, 153, 161 exemplars, 99, 156, 186 F Federal Arts Project, 218 Federal Music Project, 218 Federal Theatre Project, 218 fiction, 121 film, xiii, 32, 35, 50, 93, 95

, ; and academic enlightenment, ‒; archives, ‒; contra Prussian “Industrialismus, Materi- alismus und Amerikanismus,” ; deletes natural sciences from gymnasia, ; dossiers and ministerial filing, , ‒, ‒; ducal interventions about ranking students, ‒; the ducal (later royal) li- brary, , ; and the Fischer affair, ‒ ; in general, , ; ministry orders no dictation in lectures, ; nationalization of education, ; recognizes the doctor of philosophy, ; and Vacchieri’s visitation to Ingolstadt, ‒. See also universities

(New Zealand) (1989), viii Education Reform Act (United Kingdom) (1968), viii Eisenhower, Dwight, 39 elitism, 47– 48 End of History and the Last Man, The (Fukuyama), 32 England, 127. See also United Kingdom Enlightenment, 143 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 100 Equal Protection Clause, 100– 101 Farley, Lara Geer, 88 Farred, Grant, 14, 124 Finkin, Matthew, 74, 83, 94– 95, 97 First Amendment, 12, 47, 56, 80, 86, 91; and academic freedom, 9– 10, 51– 52, 98, 137– 38, 142– 43, 148; “bad tendency” theory, 139; citizen and employee speech