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Nikolai Nikolaevich and Camouflage

Two Novels

Series: Russian Library
Yuz Aleshkovsky turned Soviet reality into mad monologues whose unhinged speakers revealed everyday and cosmic truths. These two novels display his vivid imagination and unmistakable voice.

Author Information

AleshkovskyYuz:

Yuz Aleshkovsky was born in 1929 in Krasnoyarsk and grew up in Moscow. He served in the Soviet navy and was imprisoned from 1950 to 1953 for “violating discipline.” He published children's books but became best known for his songs and novels circulated in samizdat before he emigrated to the United States in 1979. His novels Kangaroo and The
Hand were published in English translation in the 1980s. In 2001 he received the Pushkin Prize of the Alfred Toepfer Foundation for his entire body of work. He lives in Middletown, Connecticut.Yuz Aleshkovsky was born in 1929 in Krasnoyarsk and grew up in Moscow. He served in the Soviet navy and was imprisoned from 1950 to 1953 for “violating discipline.” He published children’s books but became best known for his songs and novels circulated in samizdat before he emigrated to the United States in 1979. His works in English include The Hand (1989) and Kangaroo (1999).

Duffield White is professor emeritus of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies at Wesleyan University. He is the translator of Tolstoi in the Sixties by Boris Eikhenbaum (1982).

Susanne Fusso is Marcus L. Taft Professor of Modern Languages and professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies at Wesleyan University. She is the translator of Trepanation of the Skull by Sergey Gandlevsky (2014).

Reviews

Derek C. Maus, State University of New York at Potsdam:
Yuz Aleshkovsky is absolutely brilliant. These outstanding English translations of two of his early works offer readers a chance to encounter his idiosyncratic, occasionally profane, and thoroughly remarkable voice.

Michael Gordin, Princeton University:
Completely irreverent — in the best possible way. Underneath the biting satire and the unrelenting hilarity, Yuz Aleshkovsky's rapid-fire prose reveals intricate insights into late Soviet politics, culture, science, and daily life. The deeply problematic narrators of both novellas will introduce you to a Soviet Union you hadn't suspected existed.

Yvonne Howell, University of Richmond:
Forget old myths about censored, obedient Soviet citizens, and meet Aleshkovsky’s wildly enterprising and emphatically free-thinking protagonists who don’t hesitate to use colorful language to make a point about body politics, the scientific use of semen, and other absurdities of modern life.

$14.99
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Audience: Professional and scholarly;General/trade;

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