Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items :

  • "Wannsee Conference" x
Clear All
Jewish World War I Veterans under Hitler

-96; Wannsee Conference, 46, 69; Wehrmacht, x Nehori, Michael Zevi, "Righteous Gentiles .," 120Il. 1 Nietzsche, Friedrich, 116, 118, 137, 141, 159 Nolte, Ernst, Das Vngehen der Vr«gangenheit, 65 n. 1, 66, 167 Nora, Pierre, 6-7,8 n. 4 Novick, Peter, 156 n. 13 Omnicide, relation to genocide, 40-61; and technology, 44-:'i 1, ,)8-sg Orwell, George, "Such, Such Were the Joys," 159 n. 19 Paldiel, M., The Path of the Righteous, 1 24 n. 2 Peels, H. G. L., The Vengeance of God, 157 n. 1.~ 198 Index Pitard, Wayne T., "Amara ekemus," '57 n. 15 Plato, 23, 31, 129 Pohl

. 28 D. Pohl, Nationalsozialistische J~gung in Ostgalizien 1941-19# Organisa- tion und Durchfiihrung eines sfQQ:tlichen MttssemJerbrechens (Munich, 191}6), 83-93. 29 Aly, "Final Solution," 29. 30 C. Gerlach, "The Wannsee Conference," in The Holocaust: Origins, Implementlltion, Afterntllth, ed. 0. Bartov (London, 2000). 31 H. Friedlander, The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution (Chapel Hill, 1995), 67-68. 32 On both Hitler's antisemitic obsession and his frequent attempts to remain aloof Killing Space 91 Aly makes a convincing case

; regimental associations; Reichsbanner; RjF; Stahlhelm Volksgemeinschaft (people’s community), 8 – 9, 61 – 62 volunteering (WWI), 16 – 17, 27 Wannsee Conference, 170, 173 – 75, 186, 205 War Ministry, 33 – 34, 88, 102 – 3 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, 199 – 200 294 index wartime experiences antisemitism, 7 – 8, 13 – 14, 20 – 22, 26 – 34, 45 combat experience, 18 – 20, 24, 28, 32, 33, 40 comradeship and solidarity, 4, 6, 19 – 24, 27, 32, 46 – 47, 114 enthusiasm for war, 7, 12, 15 – 18, 23 – 24 identity and, 24, 30, 31, 40, 43 – 44, 80, 111; war experience as key to, 4, 6 – 7

–13 utopian conception, counterpreservation as, 38–40 Vasudevan, Alex, 12, 86 Verheyen, Dirk, 218 “victim Germany,” 145 Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C., 186 Index 255 Villa Parey, “wounds of memory” (Wunden der Erinnerung) at, 3, 28 Viollet-le-Duc, Eugène Emmanuel, 36, 37, 38 void, trope of, 183–85 Volksbühne, 95 Wagenplatz (trailer park) adjacent to Køpi Hausprojekt, 65, 70, 72, 79 Wannsee Conference (1942), 32, 136 Wedding, 79, 83, 217, 232, 233 Weidt, Otto, 106, 107, 117–18, 119 Weiffenbach, Henryk, 101, 115n64, 123, 125n84, 129 Weisenborn, Günther

Reihenfolge,” 14 June 1942, USHMMA RG-15.083M, reel 4. 160. Eichmann to Gestapo Düsseldorf, 2 December 1941, in Meyer, Unternehmen Sieben, 236–37. Also see Gerlach, “Wannsee Conference,” 770–71. 161. Memo from Stapo-Außendienststelle Würzburg, 22 November 1941, ITS Digital Archive, 1.2.3.0/82165154, accessed at USHMMA. 162. Helmuth James von Moltke to Freya Moltke, 17 November 1941, in Moltke, Letters to Freya, 186–87. 163. Klemperer, diary entry for 28 November 1941, in I Will Bear Witness, 1:446. 164. Klepper, diary entry for 2 December 1941, in Unter dem Schatten

ghettos of Lodz, Minsk, and Riga in late 1941. The Wannsee Conference in January 1942 established Theresienstadt as the destination for highly decorated and war-wounded Jewish veterans. The German public’s negative reaction to the deportations of Jews that began the previous year, together with interventions by senior officers, pressured the SS to create a special camp for “privileged” types of German Jews. There- sienstadt was merely a ruse, a way station on the road to Auschwitz. But as chapter 6 shows, despite the brutal conditions they faced there and at

170 Chapter 6 Defiant Germanness At the Wannsee Conference on 20 January 1942, the SS decreed that war-wounded and war-decorated Jews would not be deported to the East along with the rest of the Jewish population; rather, they were to be “relocated” to the privileged camp at Theresienstadt. To be sure, Theresienstadt was a theoretical construction, a way station on the road to Auschwitz. Yet the decision reveals that indecisiveness, expediency, and contradictory decision-making characterized Nazi policy against Jewish war veterans, which stood in sharp

of Colonial Exploitation," in The Sllvage War 7 Oosely tied to the military aspects of the operation was the decision to use this opportunity to "eliminate" EuropeanJewryonceand for all, a policy given official sanction during the Wannsee Conference of Jan- uary 20, 1942, during which the work of the various agencies involved in the 11Final Solution" was brought under the overall control of the SS six months after the attack on Russia was launched.8 The so-called "Fi- nal Solution of the Jewish Question" by mass, industrial murder of the Jewish population of

Volunteer Corps, 50 Vučić, Aleksandar, 135, 223 Vukić, Igor, 144 Vukovar, 136 Vulin, Aleksandar, 79 Wannsee conference, 54 War Veterans Committee, 116 Warsaw, 42, 190, 219 Warsaw Ghetto, 219 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising memorial, 61 Washington, DC, 13, 20, 68 Wehrmacht, 2, 39, 49–50, 52, 70, 155, 157 What Are the Activists Fighting For? 155 white armbanders, 155, 159, 172, 195 Wiesel, Elie, 5 World Lithuanian Olympics, 151 World War I. See specific countries World War II. See specific countries Yad Vashem, 68, 78–79, 131–32, 144, 192