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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published online by De Gruyter Mouton May 23, 2022

Translanguaging in self-praise on Chinese social media

Wei Ren ORCID logo and Yaping Guo

Abstract

Self-praise is very common on social media, and various translanguaging strategies are often used by internet users in online communication. Most of the existing studies on self-praise have centered on strategies for self-praise, ignoring the multimodal communication styles involved. On the other hand, although translanguaging has attracted significant research attention in linguistics and multilingual education, few studies have explored translanguaging in a specific speech act. Therefore, this study investigates the translanguaging practices involved in self-praising in Chinese netizens’ social media by analyzing 300 Chinese microblog posts containing self-praise. The results indicate that there are three major categories of translanguaging strategies in self-praise in microblogs, namely multimodal, multilingual and multi-semiotic resources, with various sub-strategies involved in each category. The study also discusses the possible factors motivating Chinese netizens to deploy translanguaging practices to self-praise on social media. This study contributes to the body of research on translanguaging pragmatics in social media communication.


Corresponding author: Wei Ren, School of Foreign Languages, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, 100083, Beijing, China, E-mail:

Funding source: National Office for Philosophy and Social Sciences

Award Identifier / Grant number: 20BYY066

  1. Research funding: This paper is sponsored by the research grant from the National Planning Office of Philosophy and Social Sciences, P. R. China (20BYY066).

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Received: 2021-10-31
Accepted: 2022-04-29
Published Online: 2022-05-23

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