Skip to content
Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter (O) March 10, 2023

Enhancements in formal process description by using a formal method

Erweiterung der formalisierten Prozessbeschreibung durch Verwendung einer formalen Methode
  • Cheng Xin

    Cheng Xin received the B.S. degree in software engineering from Huaiyin Institute of Technology, JiangSu, China, in 2016. He received the M.S. degree in computer science from Hangzhou Dianzi University, Zhejiang, China, in 2019. He is currently working towards the doctoral degree at Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Germany. He is also working as a guest researcher at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg, Germany. His current research interests include formal modeling and its applications in industrial areas.

    ORCID logo EMAIL logo
    , Lukas Grunau , Mario Thron

    Mario Thron is a member of the ICT & Automation department at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg, Germany. He studied electrical engineering with a focus on electronics and measurement technology. After his studies he planned, designed, programmed and worked on the commissioning of electrical systems for material handling systems. He joined ifak in 2000, where he is involved in research, specification and design of systems for machine and plant control. He is project manager for various research and industrial projects in this field.

    and Matthias Riedl

    Matthias Riedl is currently a member of the ICT & Automation department at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg (ifak e.V.), Germany. His interest is computer science, and he graduated in 1994. After graduation, he became an associate researcher at ifak e.V. He received his doctoral degree in 2005. Since 2008, he has led various research projects at the institute.

Abstract

To facilitate the planning of product processes, the Formalized Process Description (FPD) model was proposed. It enables users to graphically describe the requirements of a production process. However, the FPD model has limits. To overcome these limits, this paper describes an extension of the FPD model, which is called the Extended FPD model. The objects in the Extended FPD model are assigned types and logical statements to represent their specifications. Hence, the expressive power of the FPD model is enhanced. In this paper, a formal definition of the Extended FPD model is also presented. Based on this definition, a set of rules is defined to detect the contradictions automatically in the Extended FPD model. In addition, the description of requirements by using the Extended FPD model can also enable the integration of more formal verification methods.


Corresponding author: Cheng Xin, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Magdeburg, Germany, E-mail:

Funding source: Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Germany

Award Identifier / Grant number: 01IS20073E

About the authors

Cheng Xin

Cheng Xin received the B.S. degree in software engineering from Huaiyin Institute of Technology, JiangSu, China, in 2016. He received the M.S. degree in computer science from Hangzhou Dianzi University, Zhejiang, China, in 2019. He is currently working towards the doctoral degree at Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Germany. He is also working as a guest researcher at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg, Germany. His current research interests include formal modeling and its applications in industrial areas.

Mario Thron

Mario Thron is a member of the ICT & Automation department at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg, Germany. He studied electrical engineering with a focus on electronics and measurement technology. After his studies he planned, designed, programmed and worked on the commissioning of electrical systems for material handling systems. He joined ifak in 2000, where he is involved in research, specification and design of systems for machine and plant control. He is project manager for various research and industrial projects in this field.

Matthias Riedl

Matthias Riedl is currently a member of the ICT & Automation department at the Institut f. Automation und Kommunikation e.V. Magdeburg (ifak e.V.), Germany. His interest is computer science, and he graduated in 1994. After graduation, he became an associate researcher at ifak e.V. He received his doctoral degree in 2005. Since 2008, he has led various research projects at the institute.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank ITEA 3, the national funding authority of Germany (the Federal Ministry of Education and Research), and the partners of the ITEA 3 project AIToC (Artificial Intelligence supported Tool Chain in Manufacturing Engineering, https://aitoc.eu/) for their work and contributions that enabled this paper.

  1. Author contributions: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

  2. Research funding: This work is supported by the Artificial Intelligence supportedTool Chain in Manufacturing Engineering (AIToC) project, which is funded by Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Germany (Grant No: 01IS20073E).

  3. Conflict of interest statement: The authors declare no conflicts of interest regarding this article.

References

[1] M. Kramer, “Best practices in systems development lifecycle: an analyses based on the waterfall model,” Rev. Bus. Finance Stud., vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 77–84, 2018.Search in Google Scholar

[2] S. Wahren, J. Siegert, and T. Bauernhansl, “Approach for implementing a control and optimization loop for an energy-efficient factory,” Procedia CIRP, vol. 29, pp. 45–49, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procir.2015.02.210.Search in Google Scholar

[3] P. Bikfalvi, F. Erdélyi, and T. Tóth, “The “production triangle” model in production planning and Control,” in 2010 IEEE International Conference on Automation, Quality and Testing, Robotics (AQTR), vol. 3, IEEE, 2010, pp. 1–6.10.1109/AQTR.2010.5520744Search in Google Scholar

[4] S. Marek, G. Schuh, and V. Stich, “Identification of multidimensional key performance indicators for manufacturing companies,” in 2020 IEEE Technology & Engineering Management Conference (TEMSCON), IEEE, 2020, pp. 1–6.10.1109/TEMSCON47658.2020.9140138Search in Google Scholar

[5] K. Erlach, “Value stream design,” in Value Stream Design, Berlin, Heidelberg, Springer, 2013, pp. 97–229.10.1007/978-3-642-12569-0_3Search in Google Scholar

[6] VDI/VDE- Gesellschaft Mess- und Automatisierungstechnik, “Formalised process descriptions: concept and graphic representation. Engl. VDI/VDEGesellschaft Mess- und. Automatisierungstechnik,” in Chap. VDI/VDE 3682 – part 1, Düsseldorf, Germany, Verein Deutscher Ingenieure e.V, 2015.Search in Google Scholar

[7] VDI/VDE- Gesellschaft Mess- und Automatisierungstechnik, “Formalised process descriptions: information model. Engl. VDI/VDE-Gesellschaft Mess- und Automatisierungstechnik,” in Chap. VDI/VDE 3682 – part 2, Düsseldorf, Germany, Verein Deutscher Ingenieure e.V, 2015.Search in Google Scholar

[8] V. De Florio and C. Blondia, “Trading off complexity for expressiveness in programming languages for embedded devices: visions and experiences,” in International Conference on Advanced Communication and Networking, Springer, 2011, pp. 161–175.10.1007/978-3-642-23312-8_20Search in Google Scholar

[9] J. de Bruijn, H. Lausen, A. Polleres, and D. Fensel, “The web service modeling language wsml: an overview,” in European Semantic Web Conference, Berlin Heidelberg, Springer, 2006, pp. 590–604.10.1007/11762256_43Search in Google Scholar

[10] L. Christiansen, T. Jäger, M. Strube, A. Fay, and H. Schmidt, “Integration of a formalized process description into MS Visio with regard to an integrated engineering process,” Proc. iATPA, vol. 821, pp. 19–24, 2011.Search in Google Scholar

[11] M. D. S. Soares and J. Vrancken, “Requirements specification and modeling through SysML,” in 2007 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, IEEE, 2007, pp. 1735–1740.10.1109/ICSMC.2007.4413936Search in Google Scholar

[12] P. Vichare, A. Nassehi, S. Kumar, and S. T. Newman, “A unified manufacturing resource model for representing CNC machining systems,” Robot. Comput. Integrated Manuf., vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 999–1007, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rcim.2009.04.014.Search in Google Scholar

[13] A. Ulrich, K. Güttel, and A. Fay, “Durchgängige Prozesssicht in unterschiedlichen Domänen Methoden und Werkzeug zum Einsatz der formalisierten Prozessbeschreibung Universal View on Processes in Different Domains Methods and Tool for Formalised Process Descriptions,” Automatisierungstechnik, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 80–92, 2009. https://doi.org/10.1524/auto.2009.0753.Search in Google Scholar

[14] E. Arroyo, D. Schulze, L. Christiansen, A. Fay, and N. F. Thornhill, “Derivation of diagnostic models based on formalized process knowledge,” IFAC Proc. Vol., vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 3456–3464, 2014. https://doi.org/10.3182/20140824-6-za-1003.00597.Search in Google Scholar

[15] A. Tarski and J. Tarski, Introduction to Logic and to the Methodology of the Deductive Sciences, vol. 24, Oxford University Press on Demand, 1994, p. 125.Search in Google Scholar

[16] P. Wadler and R. B Findler, “Well-typed programs can’t be blamed,” in European Symposium on Programming, Springer, 2009, pp. 1–16.10.1007/978-3-642-00590-9_1Search in Google Scholar

[17] N. Mahmud, C. Seceleanu, and O. Ljungkrantz, “ReSA tool: structured requirements specification and SAT-based consistency-checking,” in 2016 Federated Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (FedCSIS), IEEE, 2016, pp. 1737–1746.10.15439/2016F404Search in Google Scholar

[18] C. Barrett and C. Tinelli, “Satisfiability modulo theories,” in Handbook of Model Checking, Springer, 2018, pp. 305–343.10.1007/978-3-319-10575-8_11Search in Google Scholar

[19] L. de Moura and N. Bjørner, “Z3: an efficient SMT solver,” in International Conference on Tools and Algorithms for the Construction and Analysis of Systems, Springer, 2008, pp. 337–340.10.1007/978-3-540-78800-3_24Search in Google Scholar

[20] B. C. Pierce, Types and Programming Languages, MIT Press, 2002, pp. 1–9.Search in Google Scholar

[21] Y. Ahmad, T. Antoniu, S. Goldwater, and S. Krishnamurthi, “A type system for statically detecting spreadsheet errors,” in 18th IEEE International Conference on Automated Software Engineering, 2003. Proceedings, IEEE., 2003, pp. 174–183.10.1109/ASE.2003.1240305Search in Google Scholar

[22] J. Edwards, D. Jackson, and E. Torlak, “A type system for object models,” ACM SIGSOFT Software Eng. Notes, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 189–199, 2004. https://doi.org/10.1145/1041685.1029921.Search in Google Scholar

[23] J. Warmer, A. Kleppe, T. Clark, et al.., “Response to the UML 2.0 OCL RfP,” Tech. Rep. Technical Report, 2001.Search in Google Scholar

[24] C. Munoz, “Type theory and its applications to computer science,” Q. News Lett. Inst. Comput. Appl. Sci. Eng., vol. 8, no. 4, 2007.Search in Google Scholar

[25] B. H. Liskov and J. M. Wing, “A behavioral notion of subtyping,” ACM Trans. Program Lang. Syst., vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 1811–1841, 1994. https://doi.org/10.1145/197320.197383.Search in Google Scholar

Received: 2022-08-30
Accepted: 2023-01-20
Published Online: 2023-03-10
Published in Print: 2023-03-28

© 2023 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

Downloaded on 23.2.2024 from https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/auto-2022-0103/html
Scroll to top button