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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter September 17, 2021

Evaluation of reference intervals for classical and alternative pathway functional complement assays

Sara Capiau ORCID logo, Joris R. Delanghe ORCID logo and Pieter M. De Kesel ORCID logo

Corresponding author: Pieter M. De Kesel, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Corneel Heymanslaan 10, 9000, Ghent, Belgium, Phone: +32 9 332 3718, E-mail:

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to acknowledge the laboratory technicians of Ghent University Hospital and Gonda Van Melkebeke for their technical assistance in obtaining these data.

  1. Research funding: None declared.

  2. Author contributions: All authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this manuscript and approved its submission.

  3. Competing interests: Authors state no conflict of interest.

  4. Informed consent: Informed consent was obtained from all individuals included in this study.

  5. Ethical approval: The local Institutional Review Board approved the study.

References

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Supplementary Material

The online version of this article offers supplementary material (https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2021-0902).


Received: 2021-08-13
Accepted: 2021-09-05
Published Online: 2021-09-17
Published in Print: 2022-01-26

© 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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