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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton October 6, 2016

Access granted: Modern languages and issues of accessibility at university – a case study from Australia

Joshua Brown and Marinella Caruso

Abstract

Discussion about how to monitor and increase participation in languages study is gaining relevance in the UK, the US and Australia across various sectors, but particularly in higher education. In recent times levels of enrolment in modern languages at universities around the world have been described in terms of ‘crisis’ or even ‘permanent crisis’. In Australia, however, the introduction of a new course structure at the University of Western Australia, which established a three-year general Bachelor degree followed by professional degrees, has resulted in unprecedented levels of language enrolments. Using data from this university as a case in point, we provide substantial evidence to argue that language enrolments are directly related to overlooked issues of degree structure and flexibility, rather than to other factors.

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to Joe Lo Bianco of the University of Melbourne and to two anonymous reviewers for comments on an earlier draft of this article, as well as to participants of the 8th Biennial Conference of the Australasian Centre for Italian Studies held at the University of Sydney, July 2015.

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Published Online: 2016-10-6
Published in Print: 2016-10-1

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