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Watching televised representations and self-identity of national minorities: Israeli Arab citizens’ perceptions of their media representations on Israeli television

Nissim Katz and Hillel Nossek
From the journal Communications

Abstract

This study focuses on how Israeli Arab citizens perceive their media representations on Israeli television and why they consume television broadcasts even though they are marked mostly by negative representations. A new concept – “Communication Boundary Situation” – a development of Jaspers’ “Boundary Situation” theory, is the theoretical framework for the article. The empirical data was collected by conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews. The findings point to different attitudes among the interviewees towards their representation in various television genres, in particular, in advertising as compared to satire and drama. The suggested theoretical framework and its empirical implementation might be useful in examining how various minorities perceive their media representations in other countries.

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Published Online: 2020-11-04
Published in Print: 2020-11-26

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