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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter April 5, 2017

Multi-Period Water Network Synthesis for Eco Industrial Parks considering Regeneration and Reuse

Sumit Bishnu, Patrick Linke, Sabla Alnouri and Mahmoud El-Halwagi

Abstract

A multi-period planning approach for water reuse and regeneration networks in Eco-Industrial Parks (EIPs) is presented. The objective of the optimization problem is to determine the lowest network cost design for such systems, by taking into account an entire planning horizon. A source-to-sink mapping approach has been proposed to formulate the multi-period planning problem. Water sources can either be allocated to water sinks, treatment units or discharged to environment. Freshwater streams and treated water are made available to mix with water sinks to enable reuse between plants. Waste water is allowed to be discharged into environment at threshold contaminant levels. The problem has been illustrated initially with two-stage centralized treatment unit, then by considering a hybrid treatment setup consisting of both centralized and decentralized options. The results obtained indicate considerable cost reductions, when compared to those developed separately for each individual period. Moreover, a decrease in the complexity of the water networks has also been observed, when simultaneously considering the entire planning horizon.

Funding statement: Qatar National Research Fund, (Grant/Award Number: ‘NPRP grant no. 4-1191-2-468’).

Nomenclature

DIip1,jp2

Diameter of pipe connecting ith source in plant p1 to jth sink in plant p2

Fip1,jp2,t

Flowrate between ith source in plant p1 to jth sink in plant p2 during time period t

Fip1,r1s1,t

Flowrate between ith source in plant p1 to r1 interceptor of stage 1 during time period t

Fr1s1,t

Flowrate to be treated by interceptor r1 of stage 1 during time period t.

Fr1s1,r2s2,t

Flowrate between r1 interceptor of stage 1 to r2 interceptor of stage 2 during time period t

Fr2s2,t

Flowrate to be treated by interceptor r2 of stage 2 during time period t.

Fr2s2,env,t

Flowrate between r2 interceptor of stage 2 to environment during time period t.

Fr2s2,jp2,t

Flowrate between r2 interceptor of stage 2 to jth sink in plant p2 during time period t

Fip1,env,t

Flowrate between ith source in plant p1 for waste water discharge in time period t

Ffw,jp2,t

Flowrate between fresh water source to jth sink of plant p2 in time period t

Cb,fw

Concentration of contaminant b in fresh water

Cb,ip1,t

Concentration of contaminant b in ith source of plant p1 time period t

Cb,jp2,t

Concentration of contaminant b jth sink of plant p2 in time period t.

Cb,r1s1,tin

Inlet concentration of contaminant b in interceptor r1 of stage 1 in time period t.

RRr1s1

Removal ratio of interceptor r1 in stage 1.

Cb,r1s1,tout

Outlet concentration of contaminant b in interceptor r1 of stage 1 during time period t.

Cr2s2,tin

Inlet concentration of contaminant b in interceptor r2 of stage 2 in time period t.

RRr2s2

Removal ratio of interceptor r2 in stage 2.

Cr2s2,tout

Outlet concentration of contaminant b in interceptor r2 of stage 2 during time period t.

Xip1,jp2,t Binary variable representing connection between ith source and jth sink in time

period t.

Xip1,r1s1,t

Binary variable representing connection between ith source and interceptor r1 in time period t.

Xr2s2,jp2,t

Binary variable representing connection between interceptor r2 and jth sink in time period t.

Xr2s2,env,t

Binary variable representing connection between interceptor r2 and environment in time period t.

Xrs,t

Binary variable representing the existence of rth interceptor of stage s in time period t.

MFip1,jp2,tmax

Maximum value of flowrate between sources and sinks.

MFip1,rs1,tmax

Maximum value of flowrate between sources and interceptors.

MFr2s2,jp2,tmax

Maximum value of flowrate between interceptors and sinks

MFr2s2,env,tmax

Maximum value of flowrate between interceptor and environment

MFFrs,tmax

Maximum value of flowrate at any treatment unit.

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Supplemental Material

The online version of this article (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cppm-2016-0049) offers supplementary material, available to authorized users.


Received: 2016-6-20
Revised: 2017-2-12
Accepted: 2017-2-16
Published Online: 2017-4-5

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