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Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter July 22, 2020

Modeling of CCLP in koryo extract production

Ji Chol and Ri Jun Il

Abstract

The modeling of counter-current leaching plant (CCLP) in Koryo Extract Production is presented in this paper. Koryo medicine is a natural physic to be used for a diet and the medical care. The counter-current leaching method is mainly used for producing Koryo medicine. The purpose of the modeling in the previous works is to indicate the concentration distributions, and not to describe the model for the process control. In literature, there are no nearly the papers for modeling CCLP and especially not the presence of papers that have described the issue for extracting the effective components from the Koryo medicinal materials. First, this paper presents that CCLP can be shown like the equivalent process consisting of two tanks, where there is a shaking apparatus, respectively. It allows leachate to flow between two tanks. Then, this paper presents the principle model for CCLP and the state space model on based it. The accuracy of the model has been verified from experiments made at CCLP in the Koryo Extract Production at the Gang Gyi Koryo Manufacture Factory.


Corresponding author: Ji Chol, Department of Computer Controlled System, Faculty of Electronics and Automation, Kim Il Sung University, Daesong District, Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, E-mail: .

  1. Author contribution: All the authors have accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission.

  2. Research funding: None declared.

  3. Conflict of interest statement: The authors declare no conflicts of interest regarding this article.

Appendix A
Nomenclature
ρ 0

the density of the medicinal materials into the first-stage tank (kg/m3)

ρ 1

the density of the solvent in the first-stage tank (kg/m3)

ρ 2

the density of the solvent in the second-stage tank (kg/m3)

ρ 3

the density of the dregs from the second-stage tank (kg/m3)

ρ 4

the density of the medicinal materials into the second-stage tank (kg/m3)

ρ 5

the density of the solvent into the second-stage tank (kg/m3)

c 0

the specific heat of the medicinal materials into the first-stage tank (J/kg °C)

c 1

the specific heat of the solvent in the first-stage tank (J/kg °C)

c 2

the specific heat of the solvent in the second-stage tank (J/kg °C)

c 3

the specific heat of the dregs from the second-stage tank (J/kg °C)

c 4

the specific heat of the medicinal materials into the second-stage tank (J/kg °C)

c 5

the specific heat of the solvent into the second-stage tank (J/kg °C)

V 1

the volume of the solvent in the first-stage tank (m3)

V 2

the volume of the solvent in the second-stage tank (m3)

θ 0

the temperature of the feeding medicinal materials (°C)

θ 1

the temperature of the feeding solvent (°C)

θ 2

the temperature of the solvent in the second-stage tank (°C)

θ 3

the temperature of the solvent in the first-stage tank (°C)

q 0

the volume flow rate of the medicinal materials in the material-transport tank (m3/s)

q 1

the volume flow rate of the medicinal materials in the first-stage tank (m3/s)

q 2

the volume flow rate of the solvent in the second-stage tank (m3/s)

q 3

the volume flow rate of the medicinal materials in the second-stage tank (m3/s)

F 1

the interior area of the second-stage tank (m2)

F 2

the interior area of the first-stage area (m2)

α 1

the heat transfer coefficient of the second-stage tank (W/m2 °C)

α 2

the heat transfer coefficient of the first-stage tank (W/m2 °C)

w 0

the concentrate of the effective components in the solvent

w 1

the concentrate of the effective components in the medicinal materials

w 2

the concentrate of the effective components inside the solvent in the second-stage tank

w 3

the concentrate of the effective components inside the solvent in the first-stage tank

v 1

the velocity of the the medicinal materials-transport screw (rpm)

v 2

the velocity of the first-stage screw (rpm)

v 3

the velocity of the second-stage screw (rpm)

L 1

the length of the first-stage screw (m)

L 2

the length of the second-stage screw (m)

δ T 1

the residence time in the first-stage tank (s)

δ T 2

the residence time in the second-stage tank (s)

η

the ratio between the feeding medicinal materials and solvent

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Received: 2020-02-06
Accepted: 2020-05-17
Published Online: 2020-07-22

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