Skip to content
Accessible Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton December 3, 2016

Limeating Inc

Furious Pete and the post-colonial hamburger standard

George Rossolatos
From the journal Chinese Semiotic Studies

Abstract

Competitive and speed eating by now constitute a mainstay in contemporary food culture. This paper outlines an emergent consumptive trend that radiates through Furious Pete’s, a popular professional speed eater, postcolonial omnivorous ethos that is tagged ‘limeating’, denoting eating to the limit or eating the limit. By drawing on the key distinction between drives and desire, I argue that the cultural phenomenon of limeating eludes and at the same time buttresses consumptive desire, while inviting the limeater’s audience to a regressive path to unbound orality, coupled with an indiscriminate will-to-introjection. Furious Pete is shown to be instituting a new hamburger standard that, contrary to the established Big Mac Index, does not concern the relative pricing of Big Macs across cultures, but the annihilation of differentially valorized gastronomic offerings in the face of cannibalistic drives.

References

Aschcroft, B., Griffiths, G., & Tiffin, H. (1995). The post-colonial studies reader. London: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Ashley, B., Hollows, J., Jones, S., & Taylor, B. (2004). Food and cultural studies. London: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Baranger, W. (1991). Narcissism in Freud. In J. Sandler, E. S. Person, & P. Fonagy (Eds.), Freud: On narcissism: An Introduction (pp. 108–130). New Haven: Yale University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Bardhi, F., Ostberg, J., & Bengtsson, A. (2010). Negotiating cultural boundaries: Food, travel and consumer identities. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 13(2), 133–157.Search in Google Scholar

Barthes, R. (2013[1961]). Toward a psychosociology of contemporary food consumption. In C. Counihan, & P. Van Esterik (Eds.), Food and culture: A reader (pp. 28–35). London: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Bartolovich, C. (1998). Consumerism, or the cultural logic of late cannibalism. In F. Barker, P. Hulme, & M. İversen (Eds.), Cannibalism and the colonial world (pp. 204–237). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Bataille, G. (1986). Erotism: Death and sensuality. San Francisco: City Lights.Search in Google Scholar

Bhabha, H. K. (1994). The location of culture. New York: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Boothby, R. (1991). Death and desire: Psychoanalytic theory in Lacan’s return to Freud. London: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Burke, P. (2009). Cultural hybridity. London: Polity Press.Search in Google Scholar

Cherry, E., Ellis, C., & De Soucey, M. (2011). Food for thought, thought for food: Consumption, identity, and ethnography. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 40(2), 231–258.Search in Google Scholar

Cléro, J.-P. (2002). Le vocabulaire de Lacan. Paris: Ellipses.Search in Google Scholar

Counihan, C., & Van Esterik, P. (Eds.) (2013). Food and culture: A reader. London: Routledge.Search in Google Scholar

Cronin, J. M., McCarthy, M. B., & Collins, A. M. (2014). Covert distinction: How hipsters practice food-based resistance strategies in the production of identity. Consumption, Markets & Culture, 17(1), 2–28.Search in Google Scholar

Elias, N. (1982). The history of manners. London: Pantheon.Search in Google Scholar

Fonseca, M. (2008). Understanding consumer culture: The role of “food” as an important cultural category. In C. R. Acevedo, J. Mauro, C. Hernandez, & T. M. Lowrey (Eds.), Latin American advances in consumer research vol. 2 (pp. 28–33). Duluth: Association for Consumer Research.Search in Google Scholar

Freud, S. (2000[1905]). Three essays on the theory of sexuality. In Freud: Complete works.London: Ivan Smith.Search in Google Scholar

Freud, S. (2000[1914]). On narcissism. In Freud: Complete works. London: Ivan Smith.Search in Google Scholar

Freud, S. (2000[1915]). Instincts and their vicissitudes. In Freud: Complete Works. London: Ivan Smith.Search in Google Scholar

Freud, S. (2000[1920]). Beyond the pleasure principle. In Freud: Complete Works. London: Ivan Smith.Search in Google Scholar

Guest, K. (2001). Introduction: Cannibalism and the boundaries of identity. In K. Guest (Ed.), Eating their words: Cannibalism and the boundaries of cultural identity (pp. 1–10). Albany: State University of New York Press.Search in Google Scholar

Heidegger, M. (2001). Being and time. Oxford: Blackwell.Search in Google Scholar

Henseler, H. (1991). Narcissism as a form of relationship. In J. Sandler, E. S. Person, & P. Fonagy (Eds.), Freud: On narcissism: an introduction (pp. 195–215). New Haven: Yale University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Hsu, E. L. (2015). The slow food movement and time shortage: Beyond the dichotomy of fast or slow. Journal of Sociology, 51(3), 628–642.Search in Google Scholar

Islam, G. (2011). Can the subaltern eat? Anthropophagic culture as a Brazilian lens on postcolonial theory. Organization, 19(2), 159–180.Search in Google Scholar

Jooma, M. (2001). Robinson Crusoe incorporates: Domestic economy, incest, and the trope of cannibalism. In K. Guest (Ed.), Eating their words: Cannibalism and the boundaries of cultural identity (pp. 57–78. Albany: State University of New York Press.Search in Google Scholar

Kilgour, M. (1990). From communion to cannibalism: An anatomy of metaphors of incorporation. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Kittler, P. G., Sucher, K., & Nelms, M. (2012). Food and culture. London: Wadsworth.Search in Google Scholar

Laplanche, J., & Pontalis, J. B. (1973). The language of psycho-analysis. London: The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis.Search in Google Scholar

Levine, M. S., Spencer, G., Alavi, A., & Metz, D. C. (2007). Competitive speed eating: Truth and consequences. AJR, 189, 681–686.Search in Google Scholar

Nutzenadel, A., & Trentmann, F. (Eds.). (2008). Food and globalization. New York: Berg.Search in Google Scholar

Parasecoli, F. (2008). Bite me: Food in popular culture. New York: Berg.Search in Google Scholar

Pina e Cunha, M., Cabral-Cardoso, C., & Clegg, S. (2008). Manna from heaven: The exuberance of food as a topic for research in management and organization. Human Relations, 61(7), 935–963.Search in Google Scholar

Sandler, J., Person, E. S., & Fonagy, P. (1991). Introduction. In J. Sandler, E. S. Person, & P. Fonagy (Eds.), Freud: On narcissism: An introduction (pp. ix–xx). New Haven: Yale University Press.Search in Google Scholar

Smith, D. (2014). Charlie is so ‘English’-like: Nationality and the branded celebrity person in the age of YouTube. Celebrity Studies, 5(3), 256–274.Search in Google Scholar

Tomlinson, J. (2007). The culture of speed: The coming of immediacy. London: Sage.Search in Google Scholar

Published Online: 2016-12-3
Published in Print: 2016-11-1

© 2016 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston