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Licensed Unlicensed Requires Authentication Published by De Gruyter Mouton August 16, 2019

On Sign Lies

An interview with Prof. Hongwei Jia

Suojun Zhang and Hongwei Jia
From the journal Chinese Semiotic Studies

Abstract

People communicate with each other in and by the signs around them. The sender might intentionally or unintentionally tell lies to the addressee through signs in order to achieve special effects or purposes which are contrary to fact or reality. These signs can thus be termed as sign lies. This interview with Prof. Hongwei Jia addresses the nature, property, classification, boundaries, and application of sign lies so as to improve the concept of sign lies proposed by Umberto Eco. Along with some new achievements in the understanding of sign lies, some problems or difficulties that scholars will confront in the coming years are also put forward.

Acknowledgements

My thanks go to my colleagues, friends, and even students who helped me in some way or the other in the process of writing, revising and proofreading this article.

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Published Online: 2019-08-16
Published in Print: 2019-08-27

© 2019 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston

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